Books That Caught Our Eye

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DragonLegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Every Wednesday we will each share two books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Leslie

Epitaph by Mary Doria Russell at Stacy’s Books.

EpitaphThis richly detailed and meticulously researched historical novel continues the story she began in Doc, following Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday to Tombstone, Arizona, and to the gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

Epitaph tells Wyatt’s real story, unearthing the Homeric tragedy buried under 130 years of mythology, misrepresentation, and sheer indifference to fact. Epic and intimate, this novel gives voice to the real men and women whose lives were changed forever by those fatal 30 seconds in Tombstone. At its heart is the woman behind the myth: Josephine Sarah Marcus, who loved Wyatt Earp for forty-nine years and who carefully chipped away at the truth until she had crafted the heroic legend that would become the epitaph her husband deserved.

“I rarely read westerns, but after reading the author’s previous book, Doc, a fictionalized account of one year in the life of Doc Holliday, I enjoyed it so much that I am looking forward to her newest book, a continuation of the story but focusing on Wyatt Earp. ”

Ten Thousand Skies Above You by Claudia Gray at The Reading Date.

TenThousandSkiesEver since she used the Firebird, her parents’ invention, to cross into alternate dimensions, Marguerite has caught the attention of enemies who will do anything to force her into helping them dominate the multiverse—even hurting the people she loves. She resists until her boyfriend, Paul, is attacked and his consciousness scattered across multiple dimensions.

Marguerite has no choice but to search for each splinter of Paul’s soul. The hunt sends her racing through a war-torn San Francisco, the criminal underworld of New York City, and a glittering Paris where another Marguerite hides a shocking secret. Each world brings Marguerite one step closer to rescuing Paul. But with each trial she faces, she begins to question the destiny she thought they shared.

The second book in the Firebird trilogy, Ten Thousand Skies Above You features Claudia Gray’s lush, romantic language and smart, exciting action, and will have readers clamoring for the next book.

“I occasionally enjoy reading a YA book, and when I do it’s usually science fiction. I enjoyed the first book in this series and am looking forward to finding out what happens next.”

Vicki

The Apex Book of World SF 4 by Mahvesh Murad & Lavie Tidhar @ Beauty In Ruins.

the apex book of world sfNow firmly established as the benchmark anthology series of international speculative fiction, volume 4 of The Apex Book of World SF sees debut editor Mahvesh Murad bring fresh new eyes to her selection of stories.

From Spanish steampunk and Italian horror to Nigerian science fiction and subverted Japanese folktales, from love in the time of drones to teenagers at the end of the world, the stories in this volume showcase the best of contemporary speculative fiction, wherever it’s written.

“I went back and forth over and over trying to decide between this book and Chasing the Phoenix by Michael Swanwick, another one of Bob’s books. In the end I went with this book, but am adding both to my tbr list, along with the first 3 books in The Apex Book of World SF series.”

final frontiersmanThe Final Frontiersman by James Campbell @ Griperang’s Bookmarks.

Hundreds of hardy people have tried to carve a living in the Alaskan bush, but few have succeeded as consistently as Heimo Korth. Originally from Wisconsin, Heimo traveled to the Arctic wilderness in his feverous twenties. Now, more than three decades later, Heimo lives with his wife and two daughters approximately 200 miles from civilization—a sustainable, nomadic life bounded by the migrating caribou, the dangers of swollen rivers, and by the very exigencies of daily existence.

“I love books that are full of adventure”

Serena

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: An Illustrated History, Anthology, and Guide by Magnus Bartlett and Robert O’Connor, published by Odyssey Books & Maps at Rose City Reader.

HiroshimaAs the 70th anniversary of their destruction approaches, Odyssey tells the story of these uniquely twinned cities using literary extracts from Socrates, Murasaki Shikibu, St Francis Xavier, Tokugawa Ieyasu, Commodore Perry, Vincent Van Gogh, Giacomo Puccini, Jack London, Sun Yat Sen, D. T. Suzuki, Eleanor Roosevelt, Josef Stalin, Winston Churchill, Dame Edith Sitwell, Keiji Nakazawa, Shusaku Endo, Kenzaburo Oe, Eugene Smith, John Hersey, Muddy Waters, Akira Kurosawa, Jonathan Schell and many more.

Odyssey also uses rarely seen photographs and documents to tell the full story of what led up to the bombings, in the hope it will spark discussion and debate about nuclear weapons and their place in the modern world. Odyssey will also show the cities as they are today, showing the resilience of their citizens by rebuilding after total destruction. 150 color and black & white illustrations.

“I like books that combine not only text but also maps, images, and illustrations to talk about history, and WWII is one of the most intriguing. I couldn’t pass this one up this week.”

Mailbox Monday

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Sunflower MailboxMailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

Hope everyone had a productive reading week and a few new books.

Add your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back here on Wednesday when I will post a selection of Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

4 Comments
DragonLegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Every Wednesday we will each share two books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Vicki

The Three-Year Swim Club by Julie Checkoway @ Bermudaonion

3 yr. swim clubIn 1937, a schoolteacher on the island of Maui challenged a group of poverty-stricken sugar plantation kids to swim upstream against the current of their circumstance. The goal? To become Olympians.

They faced seemingly insurmountable obstacles. The children were Japanese-American, were malnourished and barefoot and had no pool; they trained in the filthy irrigation ditches that snaked down from the mountains into the sugarcane fields. Their future was in those same fields, working alongside their parents in virtual slavery, known not by their names but by numbered tags that hung around their necks. Their teacher, Soichi Sakamoto, was an ordinary man whose swimming ability didn’t extend much beyond treading water.

In spite of everything, including the virulent anti-Japanese sentiment of the late 1930s, in their first year the children outraced Olympic athletes twice their size; in their second year, they were national and international champs, shattering American and world records and making headlines from L.A. to Nazi Germany. In their third year, they’d be declared the greatest swimmers in the world, but they’d also face their greatest obstacle: the dawning of a world war and the cancellation of the Games. Still, on the battlefield, they’d become the 20th century’s most celebrated heroes, and in 1948, they’d have one last chance for Olympic glory.

They were the Three-Year Swim Club. This is their story.

“This sounds like such a good book! I love when people who don’t have much in life do something amazing.”

The Victim by Eric Matheny @ Fiction Books.

the victimIn the spring of 2003 on a desolate stretch of Arizona highway, Anton Mackey’s life was changed forever. A reckless decision to get behind the wheel when he was in no condition to drive spawned a moment that threatened to destroy everything the 21 year-old had spent his life working toward. In an instant, Anton made a decision to save himself. A decision that claimed the lives of two people.

Eleven years later, Anton is a rising star in the Miami criminal defense community. He is married and has an infant daughter. He is earning a good living and steadily building a name for himself as an aggressive advocate for the accused. Anton shares an office with veteran defense attorney, Jack Savarese. A mentor of sorts, Anton strives to model his practice – and career – after Jack’s. A Miami criminal defense legend, Jack’s accomplishments in the courtroom are second to none. However, Jack remains burdened by the conviction of Osvaldo Garcia, a mentally-ill client from ten years earlier found guilty and sentenced to life in prison for the death of a troubled teen.

When Daniella Avery, the beautiful wife of a man accused of a heinous act of domestic violence, comes into Anton’s office seeking his services, Anton thinks he’s landed a great case with a great fee. But when he succumbs to temptation, he realizes that Daniella is a figure from his past.

Anton finds himself caught between the possibility of being exposed and the fact that his client – Daniella’s husband – may be an innocent pawn in the victim’s attempt to carry out her revenge against Anton. As Anton struggles to balance defending his client while concealing the secret he has sought to forget, he uncovers the truth behind what really happened on that highway eleven years earlier. The truth that may be connected to the conviction of Osvaldo Garcia.

“​I love reading about people with secrets and seeing how their story ends​”.

Serena

Exit Wounds: Soldiers’ Stories Life After Iraq and Afghanistan by Jim Lommasson @ Rose City Reader.

ExitWounds

Lommasson presents students, academics, researchers, and general interest readers with a collaborative work of photography and interviews featuring United States veterans of the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. The author has organized the main body of his text in parts devoted to the stories of fifty veterans of the two wars, following a foreword by Massachusetts physician and psychologist Jonathan Shay, and an open letter from U.S. marine Eddie Black regarding the distance between the experience of war and the collection of stories presented in the text.

“This sounds like a fascinating project and I’d be interested to see how this comes together.”

The Gap of Time by Jeanette Winterson @ Book Dilettante.

GapOfTime

One of Shakespeare’s final plays, “The Winter’s Tale” is the spellbinding story of newfound love, treacherous jealousy, revenge, regret, and ultimately, redemption. Beloved and award-winning author Jeanette Winterson will introduce this classic in a new and unique way, in the first installment of Hogarth’s historic Shakespeare series.

“I’ve read a number of Shakespeare’s plays, and even though I haven’t read The Winter’s Tale, I think it would be fun to read it and compare the re-imagining of it. I had no idea that there was a series of these books.”

Leslie

AllTheStarsAll the Stars in the Heavens by Adriana Trigiani Lori’s Reading Corner.

In this spectacular saga as radiant, thrilling, and beguiling as Hollywood itself, Adriana Trigiani takes us back to Tinsel Town’s golden age—an era as brutal as it was resplendent—and into the complex and glamorous world of a young actress hungry for fame and success. With meticulous, beautiful detail, Trigiani paints a rich, historical landscape of 1930s Los Angeles, where European and American artisans flocked to pursue the ultimate dream: to tell stories on the silver screen.

“I always enjoy Adriana Trigiani’s books.”

NeedNeed by Joelle Charbonneau at The Reading Date.

Teenagers at Wisconsin’s Nottawa High School are drawn deeper into a social networking site that promises to grant their every need . . . regardless of the consequences. Soon the site turns sinister, with simple pranks escalating to malicious crimes. The body count rises. In this chilling YA thriller, the author of the best-selling Testing trilogy examines not only the dark side of social media, but the dark side of human nature.

“YA thrillers are a good choice when I’m looking for something a little different.”

Mailbox Monday

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Sunflower MailboxMailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

Another week has just flown past! And that means more new books in the mailbox.

I hope everyone had a good week.

Join in by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back here on Wednesday when I will post a selection of Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

4 Comments
DragonLegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Every Wednesday we will each share two books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Vicki

The Secrets Of Lake Road by Karen Katchur @ Silver’s Reviews.

Secrets Lake Rd

A haunting story about the destructive power of secrets, this accomplished and gripping suspenseful women’s fiction debut is perfect for fans of Lisa Scottoline and Heather Gudenkauf

Jo has been hiding the truth about her role in her high school boyfriend’s drowning for sixteen years. Every summer, she drops her children off with her mother at the lakeside community where she spent summers growing up, but cannot bear to stay herself; everything about the lake reminds her of the guilt she feels. For her daughter Caroline, however, the lake is a precious world apart; its familiarity and sameness comforts her every year despite the changes in her life outside its bounds. At twelve years old and caught between childhood and adolescence, she longs to win her mother’s love and doesn’t understand why Jo keeps running away.

Then seven-year-old Sara Starr goes missing from the community beach. Rescue workers fail to uncover any sign of her—but instead dredge up the bones Jo hoped would never be discovered, shattering the quiet lakeside community’s tranquility. Caroline was one of the last people to see Sara alive on the beach, and feels responsible for her disappearance. She takes it upon herself to figure out what happened to the little girl. As Caroline searches for Sara, she uncovers the secrets her mother has been hiding, unraveling the very foundation of everything she knows about herself and her family. The Secrets of Lake Road by Karen Katchur is a riveting novel that is impossible to put down and hard to forget.

“Everything about the book description interested me.”

Island Girls by Nancy Thayer @ Bookfan.

Island Girls

Charming ladies’ man Rory Randall dies with one last trick up his sleeve: His will includes a calculating clause mandating a summer-long reunion for his daughters, all from different marriages—that is, if they hope to inherit his posh Nantucket house. Relations among the three sisters are sour thanks to long-festering jealousies, resentments, and misunderstandings. Arden, a successful television host in Boston, hasn’t been back to the island since her teenage years, when accusations of serious misbehavior led to her banishment. College professor Meg hopes to use her summer to finish a literary biography and avoid an amorous colleague. And secretive Jenny, an IT specialist, faces troubling questions about her identity while longing for her sisters’ acceptance.

To their surprise, the three young women find their new found sisterhood easier to trust than the men who show up to complicate their lives. And if that weren’t problematic enough, their mothers descend on the island. When yet another visitor drops by the house with shocking news, the past comes screaming back with a vengeance. Having all the women from his life under his seaside roof—and overseeing the subsequent drama of that perfect storm—Rory Randall might just be enjoying a hearty laugh from above.

“I love books about sisters and ones that take place at the water. Don’t you love that cover?”

Serena

Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters by Dick Winters @ Book Ramblings.

beyodbandbrothers

They were called Easy Company but their mission was never easy. Immortalized as the Band of Brothers, they suffered 150% casualties while liberating Europe?an unparalleled record of bravery under fire. Winner of the Distinguished Service Cross, Dick Winters was their legendary commander. This is his story?told in his own words for the first time.

On D-Day, Winters assumed leadership of the Band of Brothers when its commander was killed and led them through the Battle of the Bulge and into Germany by which time each member had been wounded. Based on Winters’s wartime diary, Beyond Band of Brothers also includes his comrades’ untold stories. This is a moving memoir by the man who earned the love and respect of Easy Company and who is a hero to new generations worldwide.

“I have the Band of Brothers book, and I think this would be a great one to add to my reading.”

Animal Kingdom (a colouring book adventure) by Millie Marotta @ Infinite Curio.

Animal Kingdm

Millie Marotta grew up in rural Wales surrounded by plants and animals, and her love for wildlife shines through in everything she does. She works from her studio by the sea and draws inspiration from the wonderful wildlife around her.

With this book you can personalise her beautiful illustrations and create an animal kingdom of your own. Millie brings together a collection of enchanting fish, birds, mammals, reptiles, invertebrates and amphibians, as well as plants, trees and flowers.

From the beetle in need of a colourful, iridescent shell, to the whale waiting for a magnificent ocean home, there is a whole world of fauna and flora to explore. All you need are pens, pencils, and a bit of imagination.

“I love these coloring books, and I can’t resist ones that have animals.”

Leslie

A Window Opens by Elisabeth Egan at Book Dilettane.

WindowOpens

In A Window Opens, beloved books editor at Glamour magazine, Elisabeth Egan, brings us Alice Pearse, a compulsively honest, longing-to-have-it-all, sandwich generation heroine for our social-media-obsessed, lean in (or opt out) age.

Like her fictional forebears Kate Reddy and Bridget Jones, Alice plays many roles (which she never refers to as “wearing many hats” and wishes you wouldn’t, either). She is a mostly-happily married mother of three, an attentive daughter, an ambivalent dog-owner, a part-time editor, a loyal neighbor and a Zen commuter. She is not: a cook, a craftswoman, a decorator, an active PTA member, a natural caretaker or the breadwinner. But when her husband makes a radical career change, Alice is ready to lean in—and she knows exactly how lucky she is to land a job at Scroll, a hip young start-up which promises to be the future of reading, with its chain of chic literary lounges and dedication to beloved classics. The Holy Grail of working mothers―an intellectually satisfying job and a happy personal life―seems suddenly within reach.

Only one for me this week. My other pick was Animal Kingdom which was already chosen by Serena. I can’t resist a book about nature even if it is a coloring book.

Mailbox Monday

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Sunflower MailboxMailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

It’s Sunday evening already! Where does the time go?

I hope everyone had a good book week and some new arrivals in their mailbox.

Join in by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back here on Wednesday when I will post a selection of Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

4 Comments
DragonLegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Every Wednesday we will each share two books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Vicki

The Paris Key by Juliet Blackwell @ Lori’s Reading Corner.

QualityOfScience

An American in Paris navigates her family’s secret past and unlocks her own future, in this emotionally evocative novel by New York Times bestselling author Juliet Blackwell.

As a girl, Genevieve Martin spent the happiest summer of her life in Paris, learning the delicate art of locksmithing at her uncle’s side. But since then, living back in the States, she has become more private, more subdued. She has been an observer of life rather than an active participant, holding herself back from those around her, including her soon-to-be-ex-husband.

Paris never really left Genevieve, and, as her marriage crumbles, she finds herself faced with an incredible opportunity: return to the magical city of her youth to take over her late uncle’s shop. But as she absorbs all that Parisian culture has to offer, she realizes the city also holds secrets about her family that could change her forever, and that locked doors can protect you or imprison you, depending on which side of them you stand.

“It takes place in Paris and it’s got a bike on it. Two of my favorites!”

Heart Land by Caroline Miller @ Silver’s Reviews.

Heartland

“Heart Land” is a sweet and deft look back at life in a small Ohio farming community during 1939. Friends, family and community are linked by geographic semi -isolation. Communication is slower, but people seemed to pay more attention. In Ockley Green, every one knows and (mostly) cares about everybody else. Adults try to understand and children struggle to live up to adult values.

In this safe world, a bright and reckless boy with an active imagination conjures all the mischief he can cram into a year. It all begins when Bodacious Scurvy, the town’s notorious alley cat, crosses Oliver’s path and gives him an idea.

This well-written novel is very much like a Norman Rockwell painting – hopeful, generous, lonely, occasionally bitter and always innocent – it’s a love story for an idyllic past that draws the main character out of his childish disregard for other people’s points of view and allows him to transcend his own limitations. The man he grows into, however, will always echo a childhood he can never leave behind.

Caroline Miller’s debut novel, “Heart Land”, is a fictional memoir of a boy growing up in rural Ohio between the Depression and WWII – a time of social and historic importance that still resonates with Americans. Miller’s tone is often humorous and sometimes poignant. She creates a story that is easy to sink into and difficult to say good-by to.

“I grew up in the Ohio so this book had to be one of my picks this week.”

Serena

Writing From the Senses by Laura Deutsch @ Griperang’s Bookmarks.

Writing From the Senses

The sensory details that infuse our everyday experience—the smell of a favorite dish cooking, the texture of a well-worn coat, hearing a song that reminds you of a person or a time in your life—can be used to add richness and spark to what we write. Whether you are a professional writer (or want to be one) or someone who enjoys just writing for your own personal fulfillment, Writing from the Senses will show you how to tap into an endless source of engaging material, using your senses as prompts. The exercises will stimulate you to develop stories, imagery, and details that will allow readers to see, taste, hear, smell, and feel that they’re in the scene.

“These kinds of books always are helpful for honing skills and breaking through writer’s block, which I have given the amount of activities I have to keep track of. I hope that adding to my writing tip books, I can get back into a routine.”

Bake Happy by Judith Fertig @ I’d Rather Be At The Beach.

Bake HappyColorful, flavorful home-baked treats just say “happy,” and Bake Happy is all about adding a bit of joy back into your kitchen. A sweet baking book that will bring a smile to the dessert table, Bake Happy includes 100 recipes for cheerful cupcakes and cookies, bars and brownies, tarts and turnovers, and delicious cakes that are speckled, marbled, and striped.

This cookbook can be used year-round and will satisfy your sweet tooth and your soul. Whether you’re in the mood for creamy chocolate, colorful cake layers, tasty cake batter, or special occasion desserts, you’ll find recipes for Citrus Glazed Sunset Cake, Rustic Cherry Pudding, Secret Filling Devil’s Food Cupcakes, and more. There are also various options for color and flavor combinations, and 30+ full-color photos throughout.

“I have a mean sweet tooth and this sounds like it has some great photos and recipes that I can use for creative birthday cakes!”

Leslie

14 by Peter Clines at Martha’s Bookshelf.

14Padlocked doors. Strange light fixtures. Mutant cockroaches.

There are some odd things about Nate’s new apartment. Of course, he has other things on his mind. He hates his job. He has no money in the bank. No girlfriend. No plans for the future. So while his new home isn’t perfect, it’s livable. The rent is low, the property managers are friendly, and the odd little mysteries don’t nag at him too much. At least, not until he meets Mandy, his neighbor across the hall, and notices something unusual about her apartment. And Xela’s apartment. And Tim’s. And Veek’s. Because every room in this old Los Angeles brownstone has a mystery or two. Mysteries that stretch back over a hundred years. Some of them are in plain sight. Some are behind locked doors. And all together these mysteries could mean the end of Nate and his friends. Or the end of everything….

“Since I finished Armada last week, I’ve been in the mood for more sci-fi.”

Radioactive by Lauren Redniss at BermudaOnion.

RadioactiveMarie & Pierre Curie: A Tale of Love and Fallout

In the century since the Curies began their work, we’ve struggled with nuclear weapons proliferation, debated the role of radiation in medical treatment, and pondered nuclear energy as a solution to climate change. InRadioactive, Lauren Redniss links these contentious questions to a love story in 19th Century Paris.

Radioactivedraws on Redniss’s original reporting in Asia, Europe and the United States, her interviews with scientists, engineers, weapons specialists, atomic bomb survivors, and Marie and Pierre Curie’s own granddaughter.

Whether young or old, scientific novice or expert, no one will fail to be moved by Lauren Redniss’s eerie and wondrous evocation of one of history’s most intriguing figures.