Books That Caught Our Eye

6 Comments

unnamed

Here at Mailbox Monday, we want to encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Every Wednesday Leslie, Serena and I will each share 2 books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.
 
 
Leslie:
The Killing Lessons by Saul Black at Sam Still Reading
21301871 When the two strangers turn up at Rowena Cooper’s isolated Colorado farmhouse, she knows instantly that it’s the end of everything. For the two haunted and driven men, on the other hand, it’s just another stop on a long and bloody journey. And they still have many miles to go, and victims to sacrifice, before their work is done.

In this extraordinary, pulse-pounding debut, Saul Black takes us deep into the mind of a psychopath, and into the troubled heart of the woman determined to stop him.

I’ve been in the mood for psychological thrillers… and this one sounds pretty creepy
 
 

Tomorrow and Tomorrow by Thomas Sweterlitsch at Drey’s Library 23281802
A decade has passed since the city of Pittsburgh was reduced to ash.

While the rest of the world has moved on, losing itself in the noise of a media-glutted future, survivor John Dominic Blaxton remains obsessed with the past. Grieving for his wife and unborn child who perished in the blast, Dominic relives his lost life by immersing in the Archive—a fully interactive digital reconstruction of Pittsburgh, accessible to anyone who wants to visit the places they remember and the people they loved.

I’m always looking for some good dystopia too
 
 
 
Serena:
A Walk in Paris by Salvatore Rubbino @ From L.A. To LA
18142385 Join a girl and her grandfather on a walking tour through Paris. Follow them as they climb to the top of Notre Dame — formidable! — sample tasty treats at bistros and pâtisseries — délicieux! — and take in a stunning view of the Eiffel Tower — magnifique! Young Francophiles and armchair travelers will be charmed by Salvatore Rubbino’s lively, sophisticated llustrations and fascinating trivia about this beloved city.

It’s about a girl who walks around Paris seeing the sights with her grandfather, which is something that would most likely appeal to my daughter.
 
 

At the Water’s Edge by Sara Gruen @ Sam Still Reading
23209927 After embarrassing themselves at the social event of the year in high society Philadelphia on New Year’s Eve of 1942, Maddie and Ellis Hyde are cut off financially by Ellis’s father, a former army Colonel who is already embarrassed by his son’s inability to serve in WWII due to his being colorblind. To Maddie’s horror, Ellis decides that the only way to regain his father’s favor is to succeed in a venture his father attempted and very publicly failed at: he will hunt the famous Loch Ness monster and when he finds it he will restore his father’s name and return to his father’s good graces (and pocketbook). Joined by their friend Hank, a wealthy socialite, the three make their way to Scotland in the midst of war. Each day the two men go off to hunt the monster, while another monster, Hitler, is devastating Europe. And Maddie, now alone in a foreign country, must begin to figure out who she is and what she wants. The novel tells of Maddie’s social awakening: to the harsh realities of life, to the beauties of nature, to a connection with forces larger than herself, to female friendship, and finally, to love.

I’ve had a fascination with the Loch Ness monster since I was a kid, which is what attracts me to this one.
 
 
 
Vicki:
A Robot In The Garden by Deborah Install @ Bakey’s Book Blog
25224758 Ben Chambers wakes up to find an unfamiliar object – rusty and lost – sitting underneath the willow tree in his garden. Refusing to throw it on the skip as his wife Amy advises, he takes it in.

Ben does not want children, or even a job, and now he has found yet another reason to stay in his study and ignore everyone.

It is only when Amy walks out that Ben realises he has alienated all the human beings in his life. He has only one friend left.

This is the story of a unique friendship, and how one man opens his heart to a past he did not want, and a future he cannot lose.

This sounds very different and that’s what sold me.
 
 
 
Pirate Hunters by Robert Kurson @ Under My Apple Tree 23164968
Finding and identifying a pirate ship is the hardest thing to do under the sea. But two men—John Chatterton and John Mattera—are willing to risk everything to find the Golden Fleece, the ship of the infamous pirate Joseph Bannister. At large during the Golden Age of Piracy in the seventeenth century, Bannister’s exploits would have been more notorious than Blackbeard’s, more daring than Kidd’s, but his story, and his ship, have been lost to time. If Chatterton and Mattera succeed, they will make history—it will be just the second time ever that a pirate ship has been discovered and positively identified. Soon, however, they realize that cutting-edge technology and a willingness to lose everything aren’t enough to track down Bannister’s ship. They must travel the globe in search of historic documents and accounts of the great pirate’s exploits, face down dangerous rivals, battle the tides of nations and governments and experts. But it’s only when they learn to think and act like pirates—like Bannister—that they become able to go where no pirate hunters have gone before.

Fast-paced and filled with suspense, fascinating characters, history, and adventure, Pirate Hunters is an unputdownable story that goes deep to discover truths and souls long believed lost.

I’ve enjoyed a few documentaries on this subject, so when I saw this book I figured I’d like it. I thought this book was a work of fiction but Leslie let me know it was a true story. That makes me even more interested in reading it. Thanks for letting me know Leslie!

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Books That Caught Our Eye

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s