Books That Caught Our Eye

3 Comments
DragonLegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.Every Wednesday we will each share two books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Serena

The Year of Drinking Adventurously by Jeff Cioletti @ Under My Apple Tree.

YearOfDrinking

You want a little adventure in your life. And why not? With thousands of breweries and distilleries in the United States, there are more choices than ever on tap and behind the bar. So many, that you’re a little bit intimidated.

But throughout the course of a year you can learn to impress your friends by becoming a pub savant with “The Year of Drinking Adventurously,” a guide to getting out of your beverage comfort zone once a week for a year. Each of the fifty-two chapters features the story behind a unique beer, spirit, cocktail or wine, designed to broaden your drinking horizons. Some correspond with specific seasons or holidays, encouraging you to forget the million-dollar marketing-supported “conventional wisdom” and drink against the grain. It’s Cinco de Mayo? There’s much more to the celebration than lime-enhanced lager and shots of rotgut tequila. St. Patrick’s Day? Do you really want to be the 700th person of the evening to order a green-tinted brew and a shot of cheap whiskey?

“The Year of Drinking Adventurously” takes the social imbiber on a journey into the exciting and unknown-one week at a time.

Vicki

The Bazaar of Bad Dreams by Stephen King @ Savvy Verse & Wit.

BazaarofBadDreams

Since his first collection, Nightshift, published thirty-five years ago, Stephen King has dazzled readers with his genius as a writer of short fiction. In this new collection he assembles, for the first time, recent stories that have never been published in a book. He introduces each with a passage about its origins or his motivations for writing it.

There are thrilling connections between stories; themes of morality, the afterlife, guilt, what we would do differently if we could see into the future or correct the mistakes of the past. “Afterlife” is about a man who died of colon cancer and keeps reliving the same life, repeating his mistakes over and over again. Several stories feature characters at the end of life, revisiting their crimes and misdemeanors. Other stories address what happens when someone discovers that he has supernatural powers—the columnist who kills people by writing their obituaries in “Obits;” the old judge in “The Dune” who, as a boy, canoed to a deserted island and saw names written in the sand, the names of people who then died in freak accidents. In “Morality,” King looks at how a marriage and two lives fall apart after the wife and husband enter into what seems, at first, a devil’s pact they can win.

Magnificent, eerie, utterly compelling, these stories comprise one of King’s finest gifts to his constant reader—“I made them especially for you,” says King. “Feel free to examine them, but please be careful. The best of them have teeth.”

“Of course this is one of my picks. It’s King! ”

——–

The Past by Tessa Hadley @ Bermudaonion

Past

Three sisters and a brother, complete with children, a new wife, and an ex-boyfriend’s son, descend on their grandparents dilapidated old home in the Somerset countryside for a final summer holiday, where simmering tensions and secrets rise to the surface over three long, hot weeks.The house is full of memories of their childhood and their past their mother took them there to live when she left their father but now, they may have to sell it. And beneath the idyllic pastoral surface lie tensions.

Sophisticated and sleek, Roland’s new wife (his third) arouses his sisters jealousies and insecurities.Kasim, the twenty-year-old son of Alice’s ex-boyfriend, becomes enchanted with Molly, Roland’s sixteen-year-old daughter. Fran’s young children make an unsettling discovery in an abandoned cottage in the woods that shatters their innocence. Passion erupts where it’s least expected, leveling the quiet self-possession of Harriet, the eldest sister. As the family’s stories and silences intertwine, small disturbances build into familial crises, and a way of life bourgeois, literate, ritualized, Anglican winds down to its inevitable end.

“Family drama, I love it! (in books, not irl)”

Leslie

Coloring For Contemplation by Amber Hatch, Alex Ogg at I’d Rather Be At The Beach.

Coloring

Pick up your pens and pencils and begin your journey … This beautiful colouring book has been created to help you to be mindful – to slow down and breathe and to give you the inspiration to live more fully in the present. Each illustration has been inspired by an accompanying quote to aid your contemplation of its message while you colour. Divided into three parts, Mindfulness, Insight and Inspiration, this is a colouring journey. Each of the three parts contains quotes and simple, inspirational designs and ends with a meditation and a section with questions aimed at helping you reflect both on your handiwork and your inner journey. Dip in or work from beginning to end. Coloring for Contemplation is your calming companion.

——–

The Indifferent Stars Above by Daniel James Brown at Book Dilettante and BermudaOnion.

IndifferentStars

In April of 1846, twenty-one-year-old Sarah Graves, intent on a better future, set out west from Illinois with her new husband, her parents, and eight siblings. Seven months later, after joining a party of emigrants led by George Donner, they reached the Sierra Nevada Mountains as the first heavy snows of the season closed the pass ahead of them. In early December, starving and desperate, Sarah and fourteen others set out for California on snowshoes and, over the next thirty-two days, endured almost unfathomable hardships and horrors.

In this gripping narrative, New York Times bestselling author Daniel James Brown sheds new light on one of the most infamous events in American history. Following every painful footstep of Sarah’s journey with the Donner Party, Brown produces a tale both spellbinding and richly informative.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Books That Caught Our Eye

  1. Hi Vicki,

    I really like the sound of ‘The Past’, but that could have something to do with the fact that I live in Somerset, so I am intrigued to see if I can spot any of the places and people featured in the book!

    I know they are not identical, but I almost did a double take at the coincidental aspects of ‘The Past’ and my own current reading book ‘Flowers For The Dead’

    Thanks for another great week’s reading 🙂

    Yvonne

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s