Books That Caught Our Eye

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Here at Mailbox Monday, we want to encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Every Wednesday Leslie, Serena and I will each share 2 books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

 

Leslie
Shine On: How To Grow Awesome Instead of Old by Claire Cook at Bookfan.

28238103 Join New York Times, USA Today, and #1 Amazon bestselling author Claire Cook on a transformative journey that will help you shake off all those worries about getting older and embrace what can be the most vibrant, creative and empowering chapter of your life.
Claire wrote her first book in her minivan at 45. At 50, she walked the red carpet at the Hollywood premiere of the adaptation of her novel, Must Love Dogs, starring Diane Lane and John Cusack. With another milestone birthday on the horizon, she was old enough to know the signs: “It was time to get my act together. Again.”
 I could use more ‘awesome’ and less ‘old’!

 
 
 
 

Simple Italian Sandwiches by Jennifer and Jason Denton at Cindy’s Love of Books.
840357 Eating in Italy is all about simple pleasures, relaxing with good company, and savoring fresh, no-frills foods like traditional toasted panini, crustless tramezzini, and crunchy bruschetta. In Simple Italian Sandwiches, Jennifer and Jason Denton offer up a collection of recipes for these classic bread-based dishes, plus condiments, antipasti, and salads that are easy enough for the novice cook yet tasty enough for anyone with a sophisticated palate. From Soppressata, Fontina, and Arugula Panini, to Mozzarella and Basil Pesto Tramezzini, to Roasted Butternut Squash, Walnut, and Asiago Bruschetta, the dishes can be prepared in minutes and require minimal cooking.
With simplicity the governing rule for today’s busy schedules, Simple Italian Sandwiches is the ideal cookbook for anyone who wants to prepare vibrant, flavorful food for family and friends, and then sit down and enjoy it with them.
I had some of the best food I’ve ever eaten when I was traveling in Italy. So naturally this cookbook caught my eye. And besides, I can never have too many cookbooks.

 

Serena

The Versions of Us by Laura Barnett @ Sam Still Reading 

24480276 A man is walking down a country lane. A woman, cycling towards him, swerves to avoid a dog. On that moment, their future hinges. There are three possible outcomes, three small decisions that could determine the rest of their life.

Eva and Jim are nineteen and students at Cambridge when their paths first cross in 1958. And then there is David, Eva’s then-lover, an ambitious actor who loves Eva deeply. The Versions of Us follows the three different courses their lives could take following this first meeting. Lives filled with love, betrayal, ambition but through it all is a deep connection that endures whatever fate might throw at them.

The Versions of Us explores the idea that there are moments when our lives might have turned out differently, the tiny factors or decisions that could determine our fate, and the precarious nature of the foundations upon which we build our lives. It is also a story about the nature of love and how it grows, changes and evolves as we go through the vagaries of life.

I always play what-if scenarios in my head, especially for big decisions.  This sounds like an interesting read.

 
War Within and Without by Anne Morrow Lindbergh @ The Edge Of The Precipice

110034 An account of the Lindberghs’ wartime years, but most significantly the story of a bond between two extraordinary people. Introduction by the Author; Index; photographs. A Helen and Kurt Wolff Book

I am fascinated by the Lindberghs, so this sounds like a good read.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vicki

The I Love Trader Joe’s Cookbook: More than 150 Delicious Recipes Using Only Foods from the World’s Greatest Grocery Store by Cherie Mercer Twohy @ Suko’s Notebook

13584739 DELICIOUS RECIPES MADE EASY THANKS TO TRADER JOE’S®
Packed with unique and fabulous foods, Trader Joe’s® rocks. Now, The I Love Trader Joe’s® Cookbook shows how to mix and match items from TJ’s into amazing creations and mouthwatering meals @ Suko’s Notebook

Thanks to The I Love Trader Joe’s® Cookbook, frugal foodies can turn a one-stop shopping trip to TJ’s into a tasty treat in no time at all. The recipes in this book cover everything from crowd-pleasing hors d’oeuvres and healthy salads to gourmet entrees and world-class desserts, including:

•Green Olive and Gorgonzola Palmiers
•Red, White and Blue Firecracker Potato Chips
•Champagne-Saffron Risotto
•Prosciutto Turkey Tenderloin with Fingerlings
•Maui Beef on Coconut Rice with Macadamia Nuts and Basil
•Caramelized Onion, Fig and Gorgonzola Tart
•Sweet-Glazed Salmon with Corn Salsa
•Sassy Peach Sweet Potatoes
•Hazelnut-Plum Baby Cakes

TRADER JOE’S® is a registered trademark of Trader Joe’s® Company and is used here for informational purposes only. This book is independently authored and published and is not affiliated or associated with Trader Joe’s® Company in any way. Trader Joe’s® Company does not authorize, sponsor, or endorse this book or any of the information contained herein.

Trader Joe’s & vegetarian recipes. I have to check this book out!

 
 
A Mickey Mouse Reader by Garry Apgar @ Splendid Summer

22129639 Ranging from the playful, to the fact-filled, and to the thoughtful, this collection tracks the fortunes of Walt Disney’s flagship character. From the first full-fledged review of his screen debut in November 1928 to the present day, Mickey Mouse has won millions of fans and charmed even the harshest of critics. Almost half of the eighty-one texts in “A Mickey Mouse Reader” document the Mouse’s rise to glory from that first cartoon, “Steamboat Willie,” through his seventh year when his first color animation, “The Band Concert,” was released. They include two important early critiques, one by the American culture critic Gilbert Seldes and one by the famed English novelist E. M. Forster.

Articles and essays chronicle the continued rise of Mickey Mouse to the rank of true icon. He remains arguably the most vivid graphic expression to date of key traits of the American character–pluck, cheerfulness, innocence, energy, and fidelity to family and friends. Among press reports in the book is one from June 1944 that puts to rest the urban legend that “Mickey Mouse” was a password or code word on D-Day. It was, however, the password for a major pre-invasion briefing.

Other items illuminate the origins of “Mickey Mouse” as a term for things deemed petty or unsophisticated. One piece explains how Walt and brother Roy Disney, almost single-handedly, invented the strategy of corporate synergy by tagging sales of Mickey Mouse toys and goods to the release of Mickey’s latest cartoons shorts. In two especially interesting essays, Maurice Sendak and John Updike look back over the years and give their personal reflections on the character they loved as boys growing up in the 1930s.

What’s not to love about Mickey Mouse?

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