Books That Caught Our Eye

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DragonLegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Every Wednesday we will each share two books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Serena

The Madwoman Upstairs by Catherine Lowell @ Book Dilettante and Luxury Reading.

MadWoman

Samantha Whipple is used to stirring up speculation wherever she goes. As the last remaining descendant of the Brontë family, she’s rumored to have inherited a vital, mysterious portion of the Brontë’s literary estate; diaries, paintings, letters, and early novel drafts; a hidden fortune that’s never been shown outside of the family.

But Samantha has never seen this rumored estate, and as far as she knows, it doesn’t exist. She has no interest in acknowledging what the rest of the world has come to find so irresistible; namely, the sudden and untimely death of her eccentric father, or the cryptic estate he has bequeathed to her.

But everything changes when Samantha enrolls at Oxford University and bits and pieces of her past start mysteriously arriving at her doorstep, beginning with an old novel annotated in her father’s handwriting. As more and more bizarre clues arrive, Samantha soon realizes that her father has left her an elaborate scavenger hunt using the world’s greatest literature. With the aid of a handsome and elusive Oxford professor, Samantha must plunge into a vast literary mystery and an untold family legacy, one that can only be solved by decoding the clues hidden within the Brontë’s own writing.

“I love Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights and poetry from the Brontes, and I have plans to read other works by the family. This sounds like a good read.”

——–

Hidden Bodies by Caroline Kepnes @ Sam Still Reading and Infinite Curio.

HiddenBodies

Hidden Bodies marks the return of a voice that Stephen King described as original and hypnotic, and through the divisive and charmingly sociopathic character of Joe Goldberg, Kepnes satirizes and dissects our culture, blending suspense with scathing wit.

Joe Goldberg is no stranger to hiding bodies. In the past ten years, this thirty-something has buried four of them, collateral damage in his quest for love. Now he’s heading west to Los Angeles, the city of second chances, determined to put his past behind him.

In Hollywood, Joe blends in effortlessly with the other young upstarts. He eats guac, works in a bookstore, and flirts with a journalist neighbor. But while others seem fixated on their own reflections, Joe can’t stop looking over his shoulder. The problem with hidden bodies is that they don’t always stay that way. They re-emerge, like dark thoughts, multiplying and threatening to destroy what Joe wants most: truelove. And when he finds it in a darkened room in Soho House, he’s more desperate than ever to keep his secrets buried. He doesn’t want to hurt his new girlfriend—he wants to be with her forever. But if she ever finds out what he’s done, he may not have a choice…

“I read You this year, and I cannot wait to read this sequel.”

Vicki

The Taxidermist’s Daughter by Kate Mosse @ Silver’s Reviews.

TaxidermistsDaughter

A chilling and spooky Gothic historical thriller reminiscent of Rebecca and The Turn of the Screw, dripping with the dark twists and eerie surprises that are the hallmarks of Edgar Allan Poe, from the New York Times and internationally bestselling author of Citadel.

In a remote village near the English coast, residents gather in a misty churchyard. More than a decade into the twentieth century, superstition still holds sway: It is St. Mark’s Eve, the night when the shimmering ghosts of those fated to die in the coming year are said to materialize and amble through the church doors.

Alone in the crowd is Constantia Gifford, the taxidermist’s daughter. Twenty-two and unmarried, she lives with her father on the fringes of town, in a decaying mansion cluttered with the remains of his once world-famous museum of taxidermy. No one speaks of why the museum was shuttered or how the Giffords fell so low. Connie herself has no recollection—a childhood accident has erased all memory of her earlier days. Even those who might have answers remain silent. The locals shun Blackthorn House, and the strange spinster who practices her father’s macabre art.

As the last peal of the midnight bell fades to silence, a woman is found dead—a stranger Connie noticed near the church. In the coming days, snippets of long lost memories will begin to tease through Connie’s mind, offering her glimpses of her vanished years. Who is the victim, and why has her death affected Connie so deeply? Why is she watched by a mysterious figure who has suddenly appeared on the marsh nearby? Is her father trying to protect her with his silence—or someone else? The answers are tied to a dark secret that lies at the heart of Blackthorn House, hidden among the bell jars of her father’s workshop—a mystery that draws Connie closer to danger . . . closer to madness . . . closer to the startling truth.

“Scary used to be my favorite, but I haven’t read one in over a year. I think it’s time to get back to it.”

——–

Girls Who Travel by Nicole Trilivas @ Bermudaonion

GirlsWhoTravel

A hilarious, deftly written debut novel about a woman whose wanderlust is about to show her that sometimes you don t have to travel very far to become the person you want to be.

There are many reasons women shouldn’t travel alone. But as foul-mouthed, sweet-toothed Kika Shores knows, there are many more reasons why they should. After all, most women want a lot more out of life than just having fun. Kika, for one, wants to experience the world.

But ever since she returned from her yearlong backpacking tour, she’s been steeped in misery, battling rush hour with all the other suits. Getting back on the road is all she wants. So when she’s offered a nanny job in London the land of Cadbury Cream Eggs she’s happy at the prospect of going back overseas and getting paid for it. But as she’s about to discover, the most exhilarating adventures can happen when you stay in one place

Wise, witty, and hilarious, “Girls Who Travel” is an unforgettable novel about the highs and lows of getting what you want and how it’s the things you least expect that can change your life.

“I love books about traveling, especially on foot.”

Leslie

The Butterfly Summer by Harriet Evans at Bakey’s Book Blog.

ButterflySummer

Harriet Evans is the Sunday Times bestselling author of A Place for Us and The Butterfly Summer is her must-share new novel about Keepsake, a house in Cornwall that comes with a family legacy every bit as full of danger as it is of wonder. The Butterfly Summer is packed with unexpected plot twists that will make you gasp out loud and move you to tears – you’ll be desperate to add it to your shelf alongside the best of Santa Montefiore, Jojo Moyes and Kate Morton.

What magic is this?

You follow the hidden creek towards a long-forgotten house.

They call it Keepsake, a place full of wonder … and danger. Locked inside the crumbling elegance of its walls lies the story of the Butterfly Summer, a story you’ve been waiting all your life to hear.

This house is Nina Parr’s birthright. It holds the truth about her family – and a chance to put everything right at last.

“Sounds like a story I would enjoy.”

——–

My second pick was also The Taxidermist’s Daughter by Kate Mosse.

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2 thoughts on “Books That Caught Our Eye

  1. Mad Woman Upstairs and Hidden Bodies definitely caught my eye this week.

    I am looking forward my book, The Taxidermist’s Daughter. I like spooky every once in a while. 🙂

    Thanks for another week of great picks.

    Elizabeth
    Silver’s Reviews
    My Blog

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