Books That Caught Our Eye

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DragonLegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Every Wednesday we will each share two books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Serena

The Copyright Handbook: What Every Writer Needs to Know by Stephen Fishman @ Under My Apple Tree.

What copyright law protects….and doesn’t

No writers like to see their hard work or creativity copied by others – or to be accused of copying. Fortunately, The Copyright Handbook provides everything you need to protect yourself! Find information and forms to help you:

register your work
maximize copyright protection
transfer ownership of copyright
avoid infringement
deal with infringers
understand the “fair use” rule
get permission to use copyrighted work
profit from your copyright

This edition is updated to provide the latest copyright regulations, forms and rules for filing a copyright application.

Leslie

Minimalist Living: Decluttering for Joy, Health, and Creativity by Genevieve Parker Hill at Library of Clean Reads.

From About.com Reader’s Choice Award-winning author Genevieve Parker Hill comes a fresh new minimalism guide for everyone.

If your garage, attic, closets, and surfaces are filled with clutter, all that extra stuff can get in the way of a full experience of life as it was meant to be lived. Minimalist Living covers not only techniques for decluttering, but how to fill your new found space with meaningful activities that add joy to your life and support your goals.

This guide to simplifying for health, joy, and creativity teaches: Why you should define your own sense of minimalism How to create your “Minimalist Mission Statement”; How to use the techniques of “blazing” and “gazing” to declutter; Why decluttering now can lead to a happier, healthier, and more creative life; How to deal with sentimental items without losing their meaning; The amazing connection between minimalism and living your soul’s deepest purpose; And much more…”

“My house could use this after several decades of clutter collecting.”

——–

The Last Cruise by Kate Christensen at Carol’s Notebook.

The 1950s vintage ocean liner Queen Isabella is making her final voyage before heading to the scrapyard. For the guests on board, among them Christine Thorne, a former journalist turned Maine farmer, it’s a chance to experience the bygone mid-20th century era of decadent luxury cruising, complete with fine dining, classic highballs, string quartets, and sophisticated jazz. Smoking is allowed but not cell phones–or children, for that matter. The Isabella sets sail from Long Beach, CA into calm seas on a two-week retro cruise to Hawaii and back.

But this is the second decade of an uncertain new millennium, not the sunny, heedless fifties, and certain disquieting signs of strife and malfunction above and below decks intrude on the festivities. Down in the main galley, Mick Szabo, a battle-weary Hungarian executive sous-chef, watches escalating tensions among the crew. Meanwhile, Miriam Koslow, an elderly Israeli violinist with the Sabra Quartet, becomes increasingly aware of the age-related vulnerabilities of the ship herself and the cynical corners cut by the cruise ship company, Cabaret.

When a time of crisis begins, Christine, Mick, and Miriam find themselves facing the unknown together in an unexpected and startling test of their characters.

“I like the sound of this one!”

Martha

The Last Girl by Nadia Murad found at BermudaOnion’s Weblog

In this intimate memoir of survival, a former captive of the Islamic State tells her harrowing and ultimately inspiring story.

Nadia Murad was born and raised in Kocho, a small village of farmers and shepherds in northern Iraq. A member of the Yazidi community, she and her brothers and sisters lived a quiet life. Nadia had dreams of becoming a history teacher or opening her own beauty salon. On August 15th, 2014, when Nadia was just twenty-one years old, this life ended. Islamic State militants massacred the people of her village, executing men who refused to convert to Islam and women too old to become sex slaves. Six of Nadia’s brothers were killed, and her mother soon after, their bodies swept into mass graves. Nadia was taken to Mosul and forced, along with thousands of other Yazidi girls, into the ISIS slave trade. Nadia would be held captive by several militants and repeatedly raped and beaten. Finally, she managed a narrow escape through the streets of Mosul, finding shelter in the home of a Sunni Muslim family whose eldest son risked his life to smuggle her to safety. Today, Nadia’s story–as a witness to the Islamic State’s brutality, a survivor of rape, a refugee, a Yazidi–has forced the world to pay attention to the ongoing genocide in Iraq. It is a call to action, a testament to the human will to survive, and a love letter to a lost country, a fragile community, and a family torn apart by war.

“This sounds gripping.”

——–

The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle by Leslie Connor found at Under My Apple Tree.

From the critically acclaimed author of Waiting for Normal and All Rise for the Honorable Perry T. Cook, Leslie Connor, comes a deeply poignant and beautifully crafted story about self-reliance, redemption, and hope.

Mason Buttle is the biggest, sweatiest kid in his grade, and everyone knows he can barely read or write. Mason’s learning disabilities are compounded by grief. Fifteen months ago, Mason’s best friend, Benny Kilmartin, turned up dead in the Buttle family’s orchard. An investigation drags on, and Mason, honest as the day is long, can’t understand why Lieutenant Baird won’t believe the story Mason has told about that day.

Both Mason and his new friend, tiny Calvin Chumsky, are relentlessly bullied by the other boys in their neighborhood, so they create an underground club space for themselves. When Calvin goes missing, Mason finds himself in trouble again. He’s desperate to figure out what happened to Calvin, and eventually, Benny.

But will anyone believe him?

“Oh, this sounds like it might be a bit of a heartbreak. ”

2 thoughts on “Books That Caught Our Eye

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