Books That Caught Our Eye

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DragonLegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.Every Wednesday we will each share two books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Serena

The Rain Watcher by Tatiana De Rosnay @ Lori’s Reading Corner.

The first new novel in four years from the beloved superstar author of Sarah’s Key, a heartbreaking and uplifting story of family secrets and devastating disaster, in the tradition of THE NEST.

“Hypnotic, passionate, ominous and tender―unforgettable.” ―Jenna Blum, New York Times and internationally bestselling author of Those Who Save Us

The Rain Watcher is a powerful family drama set in Paris as the Malegarde family gathers to celebrate the father’s 70th birthday. Their hidden fears and secrets are slowly unraveled as the City of Light undergoes a stunning natural disaster. Seen through the eyes of charismatic photographer Linden Malegarde, the youngest son, all members of the family will have to fight to keep their unity against tragic circumstances.

In this profound and intense novel of love and redemption, De Rosnay demonstrates all of her writer’s skills both as an incredible storyteller but also as a soul seeker.

“I’ve heard great things about this author..”

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A Bold and Dangerous Family by Caroline Moorehead at Bookramblings.

Mussolini was not only ruthless: he was subtle and manipulative. Black-shirted thugs did his dirty work for him: arson, murder, destruction of homes and offices, bribes, intimidation and the forcible administration of castor oil. His opponents – including editors, publishers, union representatives, lawyers and judges – were beaten into submission. But the tide turned in 1924 when his assassins went too far, horror spread across Italy, and twenty years of struggle began. Antifascist resistance was born and it would end only with Mussolini’s death in 1945. Among those whose disgust hardened into bold and uncompromising resistance was a family from Florence: Amelia, Carlo and Nello Rosselli.

Caroline Moorehead’s research into the Rossellis struck gold. She has drawn on letters and diaries never previously translated into English to reveal – in all its intimacy – a family driven by loyalty, duty and courage, yet susceptible to all the self-doubt and fear that humans are prey to. Readers are drawn into the lives of this remarkable family – and their loves, their loyalties, their laughter and their ultimate sacrifice.

I haven’t heard about this book yet, but I’m intrigued..

Leslie

Cooking with My Sisters by Adriana and Mary Trigiani at BermudaOnion.

Cooking with My Sisters, by New York Times bestselling author Adriana Trigiani and her sister Mary Yolanda Trigiani, gives you a seat at the Trigiani and Bonicelli family tables. Featuring over eighty family recipes, some more than 150 years old, from Bari, the Veneto, the Italian Alps and their American hometown Big Stone Gap, Virginia, accompanied by family stories told with heart and gusto, Cooking with My Sisters is a book to treasure.

This warm, engaging, and easy-to-follow book will introduce both new and seasoned cooks to dishes including Penne Alla Roseto, Happy IBM (Italian-by-Marriage) Husband Salad, and the Tipsy Lady from Flicksville’s Ice Box Cake, all the while sharing stories and insights from family members like Grandmom Viola Trigiani, who was known to write her recipes in code to guard her culinary secrets closely, and Grandma Lucy Bonicelli, a soft-spoken woman who believed the dinner table was a respite and not a place to argue.

Cooking with My Sisters will inspire readers to try delectable, memorable dishes as they peer into the window of a home where the kitchen table was the center of the action, guests became family, and relationships were celebrated. As Rachael Ray says, “This collection fills the heart as full as the stomach Mangia, y’all “

Not sure how I missed this when it was first published!

——–

The Annotated Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler at Carol’s Notebook.

The first fully annotated edition of Raymond Chandler’s 1939 classic The Big Sleep features hundreds of illuminating notes and images alongside the full text of the novel and is an essential addition to any crime fiction fan’s library.

A masterpiece of noir, Raymond Chandler’s The Big Sleep helped to define a genre. Today it remains one of the most celebrated and stylish novels of the twentieth century. This comprehensive, annotated edition offers a fascinating look behind the scenes of the novel, bringing the gritty and seductive world of Chandler’s iconic private eye Philip Marlowe to life. The Annotated Big Sleep solidifies the novel’s position as one of the great works of American fiction and will surprise and enthrall Chandler’s biggest fans.

Including:
-Personal letters and source texts
-The historical context of Chandler’s Los Angeles, including maps and images
-Film stills and art from the early pulps
-An analysis of class, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity in the novel.

I know I’ve seen the movie but don’t think I’ve ever read the book. And annotated version would be enlightening.

Martha

Strangers in Their Own Land by Arlie Russell Hochschild found at Savvy Verse & Wit.

In Strangers in Their Own Land, the renowned sociologist Arlie Hochschild embarks on a thought-provoking journey from her liberal hometown of Berkeley, California, deep into Louisiana bayou country – a stronghold of the conservative right. As she gets to know people who strongly oppose many of the ideas she famously champions, Hochschild nevertheless finds common ground and quickly warms to the people she meets, among them a Tea Party activist whose town has been swallowed by a sinkhole caused by a drilling accident – people whose concerns are actually ones that all Americans share: the desire for community, the embrace of family, and hopes for their children.

Strangers in Their Own Land goes beyond the commonplace liberal idea that these are people who have been duped into voting against their own interests. Instead Hochschild finds lives ripped apart by stagnant wages, a loss of home, an elusive American dream – and political choices and views that make sense in the context of their lives. Hochschild draws on her expert knowledge of the sociology of emotion to help us understand what it feels like to live in “red” America. Along the way she finds answers to one of the crucial questions of contemporary American politics: Why do the people who would seem to benefit most from “liberal” government intervention abhor the very idea.

“As I am troubled by the great divide between the liberals and conservatives of America, any book that might help explain, and find common ground, sounds interesting to me.”

——–

The River by Starlight by Ellen Notbohm found at Rose City Reader.

Her brother’s letter touched a match to the wick of Annie’s doused dreams. Dream enough for her, to stroll the length of a town without the abortive glances, the stilted greetings, the wider berth given her on the sidewalk. “I could use some help out here,” he wrote. “What’s holding you to Iowa anyway?”

Annie Rushton leaves behind an unsettling past to join her brother on his Montana homestead and make a determined fresh start. There, sparks fly when she tangles with Adam Fielding, a visionary businessman-farmer determined to make his own way and answer to no one. Neither is looking for a partner, but they give in to their undeniable chemistry.

Annie and Adam’s marriage brims with astounding success and unanticipated passion, but their dream of having a child eludes them as a mysterious illness of mind and body plagues Annie’s pregnancies. Amidst deepening economic adversity, natural disaster, and the onset of world war, their personal struggles collide with the societal mores of the day. Annie’s shattering periods of black depression and violent outbursts exact a terrible price. The life the Fieldings have forged begins to unravel, and the only path ahead leads to unthinkable loss.

Based on true events, this sweeping novel weaves a century-old story, timeless in its telling of love, heartbreak, healing, and redemption embodied in one woman’s tenacious quest for control over her own destiny in the face of devastating misfortune and social injustice.

“I was drawn by the cover and left curious by the blurb.”

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