Books That Caught Our Eye

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DragonLegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Every Wednesday we will each share two books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Martha

Brain Games: Mighty Book Of Mind Benders by Stephanie Warren Drimmer and Dr. Gareth Moore found at BermudaOnion’s Weblog.

Chock-full of puzzles, optical illusions, cranial challenges, and information on the latest research in neuroscience, this awesome activity book helps you discover even more about your amazing brain! It’s kid-friendly fun, based on the National Geographic hit television show, Brain Games.

Train your brain with all kinds of amazing new challenges that will unleash your creativity and bring out the genius within. You’ll find crosswords, word searches, cryptograms, tough logic puzzles, memory tests, wacky riddles, and exercises to try with a friend. Time trials test your skills in each chapter. Write-in pages include puzzles and games as well as short explanations of the brain science at work. Tuning and proving your mental mettle has never been so much fun.

The activity book is a companion to the popular television show, book series, board game, and other Brain Games products.

“This is just the sort of book I loved as a teenager and during college years. I would like to enjoy these brain games again.”

——–

The Passengers by John Marrs found at Bookfan.

You’re riding in your self-driving car when suddenly the doors lock, the route changes and you have lost all control. Then, a mysterious voice tells you, “You are going to die.”

Just as self-driving cars become the trusted, safer norm, eight people find themselves in this terrifying situation, including a faded TV star, a pregnant young woman, an abused wife fleeing her husband, an illegal immigrant, a husband and wife, and a suicidal man.

From cameras hidden in their cars, their panic is broadcast to millions of people around the world. But the public will show their true colors when they are asked, “Which of these people should we save?…And who should we kill first?”

“This sounds like intense, rather chilling, sci fi suspense.”

Serena

Shrug by Lisa Braver Moss at Rose City Reader.

It’s Berkeley in the 1960s, and all Martha Goldenthal wants is to do well at Berkeley High and plan for college. But her home life is a cauldron of kooky ideas, impossible demands, and explosive physical violence. Her father, Jules, is an iconoclast who hates academia and can’t control his fists. Her mother, Willa, has made a career of victimhood and expects Martha and her siblings, Hildy and Drew, to fend for themselves. Meanwhile, Jules’s classical record store, located directly across the street from the U.C. Berkeley campus, is ground zero for riots and tear gas.

Martha perseveres with the help of her best friend, who offers laughter, advice about boys, and hospitality. But when Willa and Jules divorce and Jules loses his store and livelihood, Willa goes entirely off the rails. A heartless boarding school placement, eviction from the family home, and an unlikely custody case wind up putting Martha and Drew in Jules’s care. Can Martha stand up to her father to do the one thing she knows she must―go to college?

With its running “soundtrack” of classical recordings and rock music and its vivid scenes of Berkeley at its most turbulent, Shrug is the absorbing, harrowing, and ultimately uplifting story of one young woman’s journey toward independence.

“I love stories about rebellion and this one sounds inspiring.”

——–

DK Findout! Coding by DK Publishing at Under My Apple Tree.

Perfect for young coders and gamers who want a highly visual STEM book to increase their programming know-how, DK findout! Coding is a reference book that’s sure to inspire. Inside, author James Floyd Kelly breaks down what coding is and why it’s so important.

With this DK findout! book, you will:

– Explore the codes that are all around us, from traffic lights and vending machines to calculators and cars
– Read about key coders in history, such as Ada Lovelace, Grace Hopper, and Steve Jobs
– Discover the Enigma code and how Alan Turing worked to break it during World War II
– See how coders create apps, games, and computer programs using different coding languages, such as Python and Scratch
– Hear from real-life experts Jeff Atwood and Kiki Prottsman what it’s like to be a computer scientist today
– Fold out the cover for a coding quiz and timeline
– and find out much, much more!

“I think this would be a good challenge for my daughter so she can check out how computers work.

Leslie

Eight Perfect Murders by Peter Swanson at Lori’s Reading Corner.

The story of a bookseller who finds himself at the center of an FBI investigation because a very clever killer has started using his list of fiction’s most ingenious murders.

Years ago, bookseller and mystery aficionado Malcolm Kershaw compiled a list of the genre’s most unsolvable murders, those that are almost impossible to crack—which he titled “Eight Perfect Murders”—chosen from among the best of the best including Agatha Christie’s A. B. C. Murders, Patricia Highsmith’s Strangers on a Train, Ira Levin’s Death Trap, A. A. Milne’s Red House Mystery, Anthony Berkeley Cox’s Malice Aforethought, James M. Cain’s Double Indemnity, John D. Macdonald’s The Drowner, and Donna Tartt’s A Secret History.

But no one is more surprised than Mal, now the owner of the Old Devils Bookshop in Boston, when an FBI agent comes knocking on his door one snowy day in February. She’s looking for information about a series of unsolved murders that look eerily similar to the killings on Mal’s old list. And the FBI agent isn’t the only one interested in this bookseller who spends almost every night at home reading. There is killer is out there, watching his every move—a diabolical threat who knows way too much about Mal’s personal history, especially the secrets he’s never told anyone, even his recently deceased wife.

To protect himself, Mal begins looking into possible suspects . . . and sees a killer in everyone around him. But Mal doesn’t count on the investigation leaving a trail of death in its wake. Suddenly, a series of shocking twists leaves more victims dead—and the noose around Mal’s neck grows so tight he might never escape.

“Always looking for some psychological fiction that will hold my interest.”

——–

My other book choice is The Passengers by John Marrs found at Bookfan, which was already chosen by Martha.

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3 thoughts on “Books That Caught Our Eye

  1. Brain games looks great. I have it on my Nintendo DS. Trying to keep the brain working 🙂 I also like the sound of Eight Perfect Murders.

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