Books That Caught Our Eye

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DragonLegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Each week will share a few books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Serena

The Transatlantic Book Club by Felicity Hayes-McCoy at Silver’s Reviews.

Eager to cheer up her recently-widowed gran, Cassie Fitzgerald persuades Lissbeg library to set up a Skype book club, linking readers on Ireland’s Finfarran Peninsula with the little US town of Resolve, where generations of Finfarran’s emigrants have settled.

But when the club decides to read a detective novel, old conflicts on both sides of the ocean are exposed, hidden love affairs come to light, and, as secrets emerge, Cassie fears she may have done more harm than good. Will the truths she uncovers about her granny Pat’s marriage affect her own hopes of finding love? Is Pat, who’s still struggling with the death of her husband, about to fall out with her oldest friend? Or could the transatlantic book club itself hold the clue to a triumphant happy ending?

“I have a hard time keeping a bookclub in my own state, nevermind one that is transatlantic.”

——–

The Ballad of Song Birds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins from An Imperfect Christian Mom.

It is the morning of the reaping that will kick off the 10th annual Hunger Games. In the Capitol, 18-year-old Coriolanus Snow is preparing for his one shot at glory as a mentor in the Games. The once-mighty house of Snow has fallen on hard times, its fate hanging on the slender chance that Coriolanus will be able to out charm, outwit, and outmaneuver his fellow students to mentor the winning tribute.

The odds are against him. He’s been given the humiliating assignment of mentoring the female tribute from District 12, the lowest of the low. Their fates are now completely intertwined – every choice Coriolanus makes could lead to favor or failure, triumph or ruin. Inside the arena, it will be a fight to the death. Outside the arena, Coriolanus starts to feel for his doomed tribute… and must weigh his need to follow the rules against his desire to survive no matter what it takes.

“I’ve read all the others in this series. So why not?!””

Martha

Love for the Spinster (Women of Worth #2) by Kasey Stockton found at Colletta’sKitchen Sink.

Freya runs from her past, but trouble seems to follow her everywhere she goes.

Years after discovering her parents’ marriage was invalid, and she illegitimate, Freya continued to struggle with the scandal hanging over her head. When her father reappears with his real wife and daughter, Freya flees London entirely.

With an inherited country house, Freya at least has somewhere to run. She looks forward to meeting her faithful steward, who writes the most diverting letters. However, Mr. Daniel Bryce is not the old gentleman she expected, but young, handsome, and eligible.

Freya struggles with her growing feelings for her steward as they work together to renovate the only home she has left. When a stranger shows up and threatens to reveal Freya’s past, will she find the strength to remove herself from the scandal’s shadow?

A clean and wholesome Regency romance, Love for the Spinster is the second book in the Women of Worth series. It can be read apart from the series but works best in proper order.

“It must be time for me to pull a historical romance because many of Colletta’s books drew my eye.”

——–

We Are Not Free by Traci Chee found at vvb32 reads

“All around me, my friends are talking, joking, laughing. Outside is the camp, the barbed wire, the guard towers, the city, the country that hates us.

We are not free.

But we are not alone.”

Fourteen teens who have grown up together in Japantown, San Francisco.

Fourteen teens who form a community and a family, as interconnected as they are conflicted.

Fourteen teens whose lives are turned upside down when over 100,000 people of Japanese ancestry are removed from their homes and forced into desolate incarceration camps.

In a world that seems determined to hate them, these young Nisei must rally together as racism and injustice threaten to pull them apart.

“I think this is a difficult historical situation that we should all care about.”

Leslie

Final Flight by Eric C. Anderson at The Bookworm.

It’s 2023. Former Air Force maintenance officer Jason Montgomery and his erstwhile wrench-twister, Rob “Ski” Kalawski, have just landed the gig of their lives. China Air’s aging fleet of Boeing 777s now desperately needs navigation hardware and software upgrades. It’s a multimillion-dollar contract, and they’re just the guys to do it. Too easy, right?

Wrong. The Japanese firm supplying the gear knows the Chinese will reverse-engineer and steal it, so they’ve planted a deadly navigation bug to trigger at the first sign of theft. Jason’s just the middleman, but he finds himself trapped between yakuza gangsters, a tattooed dragon-lady sales exec, and murderous Russian mobsters looking to make a profit on the missing airplanes and passengers. If these crazies don’t start behaving like moral adults, people are going to die by the hundreds . . . and they do.

FINAL FLIGHT, the latest prescient tale from the man who brought us the NEW CALIPHATE trilogy and BYTE, might make you think twice before boarding the next plane.

“I like a good thriller … and I’ll be avoiding airplanes!”

2 thoughts on “Books That Caught Our Eye

  1. Thanks for sharing my recent mailbox item. I can’t wait to read The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes.

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