Books That Caught Our Eye

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At Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Each week will share a few books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

MARTHA:

Making Sense of God by Timothy Keller found at Reviews from the Stacks.

Making Sense of God: An Invitation to the Skeptical, is a prequel to The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism.

We live in an age of skepticism. Our society places such faith in empirical reason, historical progress, and heartfelt emotion that it’s easy to wonder: Why should anyone believe in Christianity? What role can faith and religion play in our modern lives?

In this thoughtful and inspiring new book, pastor and New York Times bestselling author Timothy Keller invites skeptics to consider that Christianity is more relevant now than ever. As human beings, we cannot live without meaning, satisfaction, freedom, identity, justice, and hope. Christianity provides us with unsurpassed resources to meet these needs. Written for both the ardent believer and the skeptic, Making Sense of God shines a light on the profound value and importance of Christianity in our lives.

“As a committed believer, a book to reach skeptics gets my interest.”

StormBeat: A Journalist Reports from the Oregon Coast by Lori Tobias found at RoseCity Reader.

Journalist Lori Tobias arrived on the Oregon coast in 2000. After freelancing from Newport for several years, she signed on with the Oregonian as a stringer covering the coast from Florence to Astoria; later she would be hired as a staff writer responsible for the entire coast–one person for more than three hundred miles. The job meant long hours, being called out for storms in the middle of the night in dangerous conditions, and driving hundreds of miles in a day if stories called for it. The Oregon coast is a rugged, beautiful place known for its dramatic landscapes and fierce storms. Separated from the state’s population centers by the Coast Range, it is a land of small towns reliant primarily on fishing and tourism. Many of the stories Tobias covered were tragedies: car crashes, falls, drownings, capsizings. And those were just the accidents; Tobias covered plenty of violent crimes as well, such as the infamous Christian Longo murders of 2001. Tobias’s story is as much her own as it is the coast’s, and she takes the reader through familiar beats of life–learning to live on and cover the coast, regular trips back east as her parents age, the decline of journalism in the twenty-first century–and the unexpected, often unglamorous experiences of a working reporter, such as a bout of vertigo after rappelling from a helicopter. Storm Beat tells a compelling story of a land that many visit but few truly know.

“Journalism has changed extremely since I was taught the rules of “Who, What, Where, When and How”. I think I would find this memoir interesting.”

SERENA:

Fifteen: A Compilation of Poems by Amie Woleslagle at Reviews from the Stacks.

You’re not alone.

You’re not the only person who struggles with mental health issues, not the only person with
demons floating in your mind. Amie Woleslagle wrote Fifteen because she deals with them as
well. Not to fix your pain, but to reach out and hold your hand. To remind you that you are not
alone, to ask you to stay and make the world a better place. Because the world will never be the
same without you and your unique take on life. Fifteen is a book of poems crafted from one
teenager dealing with mental health issues to another teenager in the same place. It walks
through the battle of pretending to be okay, of having people you thought were trustworthy
shatter your heart, and the battle of not giving in when your brain has given up. Fifteen covers
true friendships, embracing joy, self acceptance, and living your faith while struggling with
mental illness, all the while showing that, in the end, flowers will bloom in the ashes of your pain.

“I’m always on the lookout for new poetry collections.”

The Midnight Library by Matt Haig at Wanders With a Book.

Somewhere out beyond the edge of the universe there is a library that contains an infinite number of books, each one the story of another reality. One tells the story of your life as it is, along with another book for the other life you could have lived if you had made a different choice at any point in your life. While we all wonder how our lives might have been, what if you had the chance to go to the library and see for yourself? Would any of these other lives truly be better?

In The Midnight Library, Matt Haig’s enchanting new novel, Nora Seed finds herself faced with this decision. Faced with the possibility of changing her life for a new one, following a different career, undoing old breakups, realizing her dreams of becoming a glaciologist; she must search within herself as she travels through the Midnight Library to decide what is truly fulfilling in life, and what makes it worth living in the first place.

“This sounds intriguing.”

What books caught your eyes this week?

3 thoughts on “Books That Caught Our Eye

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