Books That Caught Our Eye

2 Comments

dragonlegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Each week will share a few Books That Caught Our Eye from that weeks’ Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

VELVET:
The Bodyguard by Katherine Center at An Interior Journey and Bookfan.TheBodyguard

She’s got his back.
Hannah Brooks looks more like a kindgerten teacher than somebody who could kill you with a wine bottle opener. Or a ballpoint pen. Or a dinner napkin. But the truth is, she’s an Executive Protection Agent (aka “bodyguard”), and she just got hired to protect superstar actor Jack Stapleton from his middle-aged, corgi-breeding stalker.
He’s got her heart.
Jack Stapleton’s a household name—captured by paparazzi on beaches the world over, famous for, among other things, rising out of the waves in all manner of clingy board shorts and glistening like a Roman deity. But a few years back, in the wake of a family tragedy, he dropped from the public eye and went off the grid.
They’ve got a secret.
When Jack’s mom gets sick, he comes home to the family’s Texas ranch to help out. Only one catch: He doesn’t want his family to know about his stalker. Or the bodyguard thing. And so Hannah—against her will and her better judgment—finds herself pretending to be Jack’s girlfriend as a cover. Even though her ex, like a jerk, says no one will believe it.
What could possibly go wrong???
Hannah hardly believes it, herself. But the more time she spends with Jack, the more real it all starts to seem. And there lies the heartbreak. Because it’s easy for Hannah to protect Jack. But protecting her own, long-neglected heart? That’s the hardest thing she’s ever done.

“The premise – so cute and fun..”

——–

TheRedPalaceThe Red Palace by June Hur at drey’s library.

To enter the palace means to walk a path stained in blood….
Joseon (Korea), 1758. There are few options available to illegitimate daughters in the capital city, but through hard work and study, eighteen-year-old Hyeon has earned a position as a palace nurse. All she wants is to keep her head down, do a good job, and perhaps finally win her estranged father’s approval.

But Hyeon is suddenly thrust into the dark and dangerous world of court politics when someone murders four women in a single night, and the prime suspect is Hyeon’s closest friend and mentor. Determined to prove her beloved teacher’s innocence, Hyeon launches her own secret investigation.

In her hunt for the truth, she encounters Eojin, a young police inspector also searching for the killer. When evidence begins to point to the Crown Prince himself as the murderer, Hyeon and Eojin must work together to search the darkest corners of the palace to uncover the deadly secrets behind the bloodshed.

“Intrigued by the place and time period.”

——–

SERENA:
The Italian by Anita Abriel at Book’d Out.TheItalianGirl

Rome, 1943: Marina Tozzi adores her father Vittorio and working together in his art gallery is her only escape from the reality of the Nazi occupation of her beloved city. Not only has she inherited her father’s passion for art but Marina is gaining a reputation as an expert in her own right.

However, Vittorio is keeping a deadly secret from her. He has been hiding a Jewish artist in their basement and one day she returns home to find her father has been brutally murdered by a German officer. Devastated, Marina flees to Florence to seek help from the man who owes Vittorio his life.

Renowned American art expert Bernard Berenson offers Marina sanctuary in his beautiful villa outside Florence and puts her in charge of cataloguing his vast art library. As Marina gradually begins to heal, she becomes obsessed with finding a way to avenge her father. As the Germans and partisans fight for control of Florence, Marina discovers that Bernard is helping to save precious art from the Nazis. When handsome young artist Carlos approaches Marina to help the partisans by using her expertise to value artworks for the cause, she has at last found her purpose.

In one daring act, Marina risks her life to save a priceless painting from falling into Nazi hands and proves herself to the partisans. But falling in love with Carlos was not part of her plan. When Carlos suddenly disappears, Marina’s dreams about life after the war with him turn to ash – and she’ll have to travel halfway around the world to unravel the truth.

“Love the WWII setting, and the art appeals to me.”

——–

The Kitchen Front by Jennifer Ryan at Book’d Out.TheKitchenFront

In a new World War II-set story from the bestselling author of The Chilbury Ladies’ Choir, four women compete for a spot hosting a wartime cookery program called The Kitchen Front – based on the actual BBC program of the same name – as well as a chance to better their lives.

Two years into WW2, Britain is feeling her losses; the Nazis have won battles, the Blitz has destroyed cities, and U-boats have cut off the supply of food. In an effort to help housewives with food rationing, a BBC radio program called The Kitchen Front is putting on a cooking contest–and the grand prize is a job as the program’s first-ever female co-host. For four very different women, winning the contest presents a crucial chance to change their lives.

For a young widow, it’s a chance to pay off her husband’s debts and keep a roof over her children’s heads. For a kitchen maid, it’s a chance to leave servitude and find freedom. For the lady of the manor, it’s a chance to escape her wealthy husband’s increasingly hostile behavior. And for a trained chef, it’s a chance to challenge the men at the top of her profession.

These four women are giving the competition their all–evebn if that sometimes means bending the rules. But with so much at stake, will the contest that aims to bring the community together serve only to break it apart?

“I loved Ryan’s last book, so this pick was easy for me this week.”

——–

MARTHA:
AWomanofIntelligenceA Woman of Intelligence by Karin Talabe found at Sam Still Reading.

An exhilarating tale of one remarkable woman’s journey to find her purpose, and herself, in post-war America. Hailed as ‘whip smart’ by Australian Women’s Weekly.

New York, 1954. A Fifth Avenue address, parties at the Plaza, two healthy sons and the ideal husband: what looks like a perfect life for Katharina Edgeworth is anything but.

As a single girl in 1940s Manhattan, Katharina was a translator at the newly formed United Nations, devoting her days to her work and the promise of world peace – and her nights to cocktails and the promise of a good time.

Now the wife of a beloved pediatric surgeon and heir to a shipping fortune, Katharina is trapped in a gilded cage, desperate to escape the constraints of domesticity. So when she is approached by the FBI and asked to join their ranks as an informant, Katharina seizes the opportunity. A man from her past has become a high-level Soviet spy, but no one has been able to infiltrate his circle.

Enter Katharina, the perfect woman for the job.

Navigating the demands of the FBI and the secrets of the KGB, she becomes enthralled by her secret mission. But as those closest to her lose their covers, and their lives, Katharina’s secret soon threatens to ruin her.

“This sounds intriguing to me – and I like thte yellow outfit.”

——–

AStitchInTime A Stitch in Time (A Stitch in Time #1) by Kelley Armstrong found at The Infinite Curio.

Thorne Manor has always been haunted…and it has always haunted Bronwyn Dale. As a young girl, Bronwyn could pass through a time slip in her great-aunt’s house, where she visited William Thorne, a boy her own age, born two centuries earlier. After a family tragedy, the house was shuttered and Bronwyn was convinced that William existed only in her imagination.

Now, twenty years later Bronwyn inherits Thorne Manor. And when she returns, William is waiting.

William Thorne is no longer the boy she remembers. He’s a difficult and tempestuous man, his own life marred by tragedy and a scandal that had him retreating to self-imposed exile in his beloved moors. He’s also none too pleased with Bronwyn for abandoning him all those years ago.

As their friendship rekindles and sparks into something more, Bronwyn must also deal with ghosts in the present version of the house. Soon she realizes they are linked to William and the secret scandal that drove him back to Thorne Manor. To build a future, Bronwyn must confront the past.

“I do like time travel and with a ghostly element this caught my eye.”

What books caught your eye this week?

2 thoughts on “Books That Caught Our Eye

  1. Passing by Nella Larsen is a great companion read to the film of the same name now on Netflix. Here’s my review (on my other blog) https://jhohadli.wordpress.com/joannes-extra-ness/blogger-on-books-ix-2021/blogger-on-books-quick-takes-v. I’m also reading another book of hers, Quicksand. Nella is from one of my favourite periods of literature, the Harlem Renaissance. I’m only recenly reading her but my long time favourite reads from this period include anything by Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes and Claude McKay’s Home to Harlem.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.