Books That Caught Our Eye

2 Comments

At Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received but to check out the books others have received. Each week will share a few Books That Caught Our Eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

I hope everyone found some new books in this week’s post to add to those ever-growing TBR piles and wish lists.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

EMMA:

Some Days the Bird by Heather Bourbeau and Anne Casey at Savvy Verse and Wit.

Throughout 2021, as COVID and climate change battled for supremacy in the hearts and minds of the world, American poet Heather Bourbeau and Irish-Australian poet Anne Casey engaged in a poetry conversation back and forth across the globe, alternating each week, to create 52 poems over 52 weeks.

With poems anchored in their gardens, they buoyed each other through lockdowns and exile from family, through devastating floods, fires, wild winds and superstorms.  Some Days The Bird, a collection of internationally recognized and award-winning poems, is the result of their weekly communiqués from different hemispheres (and opposing seasons) in verse.

“Poetry, nature, environment, international input: all great ingredients for poetry that I love.”


The Forty Elephants by Erin Bledsoe at Bookshelf Journeys.

Inspired by the true story of Alice Diamond and the Forty Elephants, the first all-female gang of London.
London in the 1920s is no place for a woman with a mind of her own. Gang wars, violence, and an unforgiving world have left pickpocket Alice Diamond scrambling to survive in the Mint, the gritty neighborhood her family has run for generations. When her father goes to jail yet again and her scam artist brother finds himself in debt to the dangerous McDonald crime syndicate, Alice takes over. Fighting for power at every turn, she struggles to protect her father’s territory and keep the people she loves safe from some of London’s most dangerous criminals.
Recruited by the enigmatic Mary Carr, Alice boldly chooses to break her father’s edict against gangs and become part of a group of notorious lady shoplifters, the Forty Elephants. Leaving the Mint behind, she and the other girls steal from the area’s poshest department stores, and for the first time in her life, Alice Diamond tastes success. But it’s not long before she wants more–no matter the cost. And when her past and present collide, there’s no escaping the girl from the Mint.
“I had never heard of the true story. But ‘the first all-female gang of London’ in the 1920s? Send me the book now!”

The Ballad of Clay Moore by Eric S. Hoffman also  at Bookshelf Journeys.

When a mysterious plane lands in his backyard, retired rancher Clay Moore stumbles upon a secret that could change the world…

It started like any other night: walking his dog along the creek, having a smoke beneath the stars. Things were peaceful and Clay Moore was happy. Then this plane came down and ruined everything.

Now Clay’s on the run from a madman that wants him dead. He’s got a secret in his pocket and an army on his tail. What’s a good-ol’-boy to do?

With his wife and bloodhound by his side, Clay must navigate a dangerous gauntlet from the wilds of Wyoming to the peak of human power. The Ballad of Clay Moore is an action-packed page-turner about a cowboy caught up in a dangerous game.

“This is very intriguing. I want to know more about this world changing secret!”


MARTHA:

Side Launch by Brock Martin found at The Book Connection.

1939, Canada unprepared but defiant, declares war on Germany and mass produces a mid-size warship, the Corvette. Thus starts the creation and journey of Canada’s first Corvette, the HMCS Collingwood. Neither designed nor equipped for the North Atlantic, Collingwood is tasked to protect convoys and take on the predatory Sea Wolves lurking below the waves.
 
Heart breaking wartime romance as Ian and Kate struggle with love in difficult times. Our hero Ian, takes command of the Collingwood. He is ready to fight with any weapon he is given having witnessed Nazi atrocities and now driven by hatred. Kate is the daughter of the Collingwood shipyards owner, a brilliant woman with a strong desire to make something of herself. She is ready to fight for her country, but first she must fight for success in a male dominated world.
 
Action packed historical fiction based on true events of WWII and the Battle of the Atlantic. Murderous Wolf Packs, German Commandos, a nail-biting secret mission, spies and saboteurs. Side Launch takes the reader through a roller coaster of emotion.
 
If you are a fan of history and love to learn, this Canadian historical fiction is for you.
“I do like historical and this is different being (for me) set in Canada.”

The Gene: An Intimate History by Siddhartha Mukherjee found at Sam Still Reading.

Spanning the globe and several centuries, The Gene is the story of the quest to decipher the master-code that makes and defines humans, that governs our form and function.

The story of the gene begins in an obscure Augustinian abbey in Moravia in 1856 where a monk stumbles on the idea of a ‘unit of heredity’. It intersects with Darwin’s theory of evolution, and collides with the horrors of Nazi eugenics in the 1940s. The gene transforms post-war biology. It reorganizes our understanding of sexuality, temperament, choice and free will. This is a story driven by human ingenuity and obsessive minds – from Charles Darwin and Gregor Mendel to Francis Crick, James Watson and Rosalind Franklin, and the thousands of scientists still working to understand the code of codes.

This is an epic, moving history of a scientific idea coming to life, by the author of The Emperor of All Maladies. But woven through The Gene, like a red line, is also an intimate history – the story of Mukherjee’s own family and its recurring pattern of mental illness, reminding us that genetics is vitally relevant to everyday lives. These concerns reverberate even more urgently today as we learn to “read” and “write” the human genome – unleashing the potential to change the fates and identities of our children.

Majestic in its ambition, and unflinching in its honesty, The Gene gives us a definitive account of the fundamental unit of heredity – and a vision of both humanity’s past and future.

“This is a different pick for me but I find the topic interesting.”


SERENA:

noquietwaterNo Quiet Water by Shirley Miller Kamasa at Bookshelf Journeys.

After the U.S. declares war on Japan in 1941, all persons of Japanese descent in the Western U.S. come under suspicion. Curfews are imposed, bank accounts frozen, and FBI agents search homes randomly.

Despite the fact that two generations of the Miyota family are American citizens, Fumio and his parents and sister Kimiko must pack meager belongings and are transported under military escort to the California desert to be held at Camp Manzanar, leaving their good friends and neighbors the Whitlocks to care for their farm and their dog, Flyer.

The family suffer unimaginable insults, witness prejudice and violent protests, are forced to live in squalor, and are provided only poor-quality, unfamiliar food which makes them ill. Later, they are transferred to Idaho’s Camp Minidoka, where Fumio learns what it means to endure and where he discovers a strange new world of possibility and belonging.

“I’ve read another book about Camp Minidoka — fictionalized — and this one sounds like a good read about the same time period.”


Terry’s Crew by Terry Crews at the bookworm.

Young Terry Crews has a Big Dream Plan: He wants to become a MULTIHYPHENATE. That means he wants to be an artist. And a football player. And a musician. And maybe a NASA scientist, too! OK, maybe it’s ambitious, but his parents worked hard so he could go to a new school—Rock City Academy, a prestigious institution (read: rich kids go there) where he’s sure he can make his mark at the talent show. He plans an elaborate performance with his new friends, Rani, a passionate engineer, and Xander, a shy kid with a head like an encyclopedia.

Along the way, Terry’s plan is threatened by his grades, which slip below Mom-and-Dad-approved levels, as well as the schemes of the school’s football star, Rick, who won’t stop until Terry quits the talent show altogether. No matter what challenges he faces, though, Terry knows that he always has his crew to back him up.

“This looks like an inspiring story for kids. My daughter loves these kinds of stories about people who have multiple interests like she does.”

What books caught your eye this week?

2 thoughts on “Books That Caught Our Eye

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.