Books That Caught Our Eye

2 Comments

At Mailbox Monday, we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but also to check out the books received by others. Each week, our team is sharing with you a few Books That Caught Our Eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

Merry Christmas Season!
One more big party to go maybe, and then you will have quiet time
to enjoy your new books, right? 
I was expecting to see more of your books, but I guess some of you were too busy to post this week.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

EMMA:

 
In 1869, when the final spike was driven into the Transcontinental Railroad, few were prepared for its seismic aftershocks. Once a hodgepodge of short, squabbling lines, America’s railways soon exploded into a titanic industry helmed by a pageant of speculators, crooks, and visionaries.

 

The vicious competition between empire builders such as Cornelius Vanderbilt, Jay Gould, J. P. Morgan, and E. H. Harriman sparked stock market frenzies, panics, and crashes; provoked strikes that upended the relationship between management and labor; transformed the nation’s geography; and culminated in a ferocious two-man battle that shook the nation’s financial markets to their foundations and produced dramatic, lasting changes in the interplay of business and government.

Spanning four decades and featuring some of the most iconic figures of the Gilded Age, Iron Empires reveals how the robber barons drove the country into the twentieth century—and almost sent it off the rails.

 
“I love nonfiction, and this one sounds fascinating.”

 


 

The Echo of Old Books, by Barbara Davis
found at Silver’s Reviews
and Book Reviews by Linda Moore

Rare-book dealer Ashlyn Greer’s affinity for books extends beyond the intoxicating scent of old paper, ink, and leather. She can feel the echoes of the books’ previous owners—an emotional fingerprint only she can read. When Ashlyn discovers a pair of beautifully bound volumes that appear to have never been published, her gift quickly becomes an obsession. Not only is each inscribed with a startling incrimination, but the authors, Hemi and Belle, tell conflicting sides of a tragic romance.

With no trace of how these mysterious books came into the world, Ashlyn is caught up in a decades-old literary mystery, beckoned by two hearts in ruins, whoever they were, wherever they are. Determined to learn the truth behind the doomed lovers’ tale, she reads on, following a trail of broken promises and seemingly unforgivable betrayals. The more Ashlyn learns about Hemi and Belle, the nearer she comes to bringing closure to their love story—and to the unfinished chapters of her own life.

 

“Can you resist a book about books? I can’t.

 


 
SERENA:
 

 

The Rom-Com Agenda by Jayne Denker
found at Sam Still Reading
 
You know how the story’s supposed to go…but love makes its own plans.

STEP 1: Find yourself
Leah Keegan is used to being alone, especially after taking care of her sick foster mother for the past year. But now there’s nothing keeping her in the sweet town of Willow Cove. It’s time to move on. Again.

STEP 2: Win back the one who got away
Eli Masterson thought he and Victoria were meant to be together until she decided to jet off to Rome for a year. Eli is determined to win her back. But how?

STEP 3: Become a romantic hero
Changing Eli’s physical appearance is easy, but to turn Eli into the sophisticated-yet-vulnerable ideal man, his girl pals force him to watch classic rom-coms. And take notes.

STEP 4: Fall in love?
Inadvertently drawn into the makeover scheme, Leah ends up being Eli’s guide through the wild world of meet-cutes and grand gestures. Even though she believes Eli doesn’t need to change a thing about himself. Even though she just might be falling for Eli . . . and Eli falling for her.
 
“This sounds like a fun story to pass the time,
especially when you’re curled up on the couch.”
 
 
Serena also chose The Echo of Old Books, by Barbara Davis.
Here is why:
 
“What’s not to love about this book!
I love a good mystery and romance, so this one sounds like a delight.”
 
📚📚📚

 

What books caught your eye this week?

Mailbox Monday

3 Comments

Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week.

Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles, and humongous wish lists.

Merry Christmas to you and your family!
I happen to be an Orthodox Christian, so I’ll have to wait for January 7th! Which does not mean I don’t have piles of books ready to grab on my bookshelves, lol.

I thought I would try a different type of picture for today. You can let your imagination ride and imagine all kinds of books ready to be delivered to you by this mail coach!
So, what books did Santa bring you?

Tell us about your new books by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back later this week for Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

1 Comment

At Mailbox Monday, we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but also to check out the books received by others. Each week, our team is sharing with you a few Books That Caught Our Eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

Merry Christmas!
It’s interesting that I tend to notice trends every week. For sure, there was a lot of snow on many of your covers this week, but also quite a few upcoming really good WWII historical novels! Time to start filling in your 2023 TBR lists!

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

EMMA:

The Wrong Mother, by Charlotte Duckworth
found at An Interior Journey
 
Faye is 39 and single. She’s terrified that she may never have the one thing she always wanted: a child of her own.
Then she hears about an online co-parenting app. For men and women who want to have a baby, but don’t want to do it alone. When the app matches her with smooth-talking, wealthy Louis, it feels as though the fates have aligned.
But just one year later, Faye’s dream has turned into a nightmare. She’s on the run from Louis, with baby Jake in tow.
In desperate need of a new place to live, she responds to an advert from an older lady, Rachel, who’s renting out a room in her cottage in a remote Norfolk village. It’s all Faye can afford – and surely she’ll be safe from Louis there?
But is Rachel the benevolent landlady she pretends to be? Or does she have a secret of her own?
 
“I had a closer look at this one, because the title reminded me
of an amazing French thriller.
This one sounds just as good!”

 


 

Cold People, by Tom Rob Smith
found at Sam Still Reading

From the brilliant, bestselling author of Child 44 comes a suspenseful and fast-paced novel about an Antarctic colony of global apocalypse survivors seeking to reinvent civilization under the most extreme conditions imaginable.

The world has fallen. Without warning, a mysterious and omnipotent force has claimed the planet for their own. There are no negotiations, no demands, no reasons given for their actions. All they have is a message: humanity has thirty days to reach the one place on Earth where they will be allowed to exist…Antarctica.

Cold People follows the perilous journeys of a handful of those who endure the frantic exodus to the most extreme environment on the planet. But their goal is not merely to survive the present. Because as they cling to life on the ice, the remnants of their past swept away, they must also confront the urgent challenge: can they change and evolve rapidly enough to ensure humanity’s future? Can they build a new society in the sub-zero cold?

Original and imaginative, as profoundly intimate as it is grand in scope, Cold People is a masterful and unforgettable epic.

 

“I hate the snow and cold, but somehow,
I recently read three amazing books set in Antarctica.
And I think I won’t be able to resist this one!”
 

 
SERENA:

 

The Twelve Dates of Christmas by [Jenny Bayliss]

 

 

The Twelve Dates of Christmas, by Jenny Bayliss
found at The Infinite Curio

 
When it comes to relationships, thirty-four-year-old Kate Turner is ready to say “Bah, humbug.” The sleepy town of Blexford, England, isn’t exactly brimming with prospects, and anyway, Kate’s found fulfillment in her career as a designer, and in her delicious side job baking for her old friend Matt’s neighborhood café. But then her best friend signs her up for a dating agency that promises to help singles find love before the holidays. Twenty-three days until Christmas. Twelve dates with twelve different men. The odds must finally be in her favor . . . right?

 

Yet with each new date more disastrous than the one before–and the whole town keeping tabs on her misadventures–Kate must remind herself that sometimes love, like mistletoe, shows up where it’s least expected. And maybe, just maybe, it’s been right under her nose all along. . . .

 
“This book reminds me of those fun, comedic Hallmark movies.
These are the kinds of holiday reads I like.”

 

 



Lessons in Chemistry, by Bonnie Garmus
found at Bookshelf Journeys

 

Chemist Elizabeth Zott is not your average woman. In fact, Elizabeth Zott would be the first to point out that there is no such thing as an average woman. But it’s the early 1960s and her all-male team at Hastings Research Institute takes a very unscientific view of equality. Except for one: Calvin Evans; the lonely, brilliant, Nobel–prize nominated grudge-holder who falls in love with—of all things—her mind. True chemistry results. 

 

But like science, life is unpredictable. Which is why a few years later Elizabeth Zott finds herself not only a single mother, but the reluctant star of America’s most beloved cooking show Supper at Six. Elizabeth’s unusual approach to cooking (“combine one tablespoon acetic acid with a pinch of sodium chloride”) proves revolutionary. But as her following grows, not everyone is happy. Because as it turns out, Elizabeth Zott isn’t just teaching women to cook. She’s daring them to change the status quo.  

Laugh-out-loud funny, shrewdly observant, and studded with a dazzling cast of supporting characters, Lessons in Chemistry is as original and vibrant as its protagonist.

 
“Yes, this week I went with fun reads. I really wanted some laughs this week.”
 
 
📚📚📚

 

What books caught your eye this week?

Mailbox Monday

4 Comments

Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week.

Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles, and humongous wish lists.

Maybe it’s beginning to look like Christmas at your place? Snow or no snow, show us the books that are already piling up at the foot of your tree.

Tell us about your new books by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back later this week for Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

2 Comments

At Mailbox Monday, we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but also to check out the books received by others. Each week, our team is sharing with you a few Books That Caught Our Eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

Somehow, I noticed lots of spooky covers this week among your mailboxes. But as snow is coming for a bunch of people, at least in the US, I hope it may help brighten the mood, lol!

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

EMMA:

 

When 10 year-old Jill meets an elderly man in a wheelchair who must get to the top floor of her apartment complex, she has no idea that their journey up ten stories will evolve into an adventure of a lifetime. Enjoy this novella while cuddling at the fireplace and sipping some grownup eggnog, or gather the family around the Christmas tree for a read-along with a carton of the straight stuff. And, afterwards… feel free to read it again.

If you’re looking for a gift-able Christmas book for someone special, check out The Tenth Floor in hardback version. Printed on premium paper and in color, this little novella is crafted to provide an heirloom quality present to be enjoyed holiday season after holiday season!

 

“This lovely Christmas novella sounds perfect for the occasion!”

 


 

Fish Swimmming in Dappled Sunlight, by Riku Onda
Translated from the Japanese by Alison Watts
found at Bookshelf Journeys

Set in Tokyo over the course of one night, Aki and Hiro have decided to be together one last time in their shared flat before parting. Their relationship has broken down after a mountain trek during which their guide died inexplicably. Now each believes the other to be a murderer and is determined to extract a confession before the night is over. Who is the murderer and what really happened on the mountain?

In the battle of wills between them, the chain of events leading up to this night is gradually revealed in a gripping psychological thriller that keeps the reader in suspense to the very end.

 

“A Japanese psychological thriller? Yes please, now!”

 


 
MARTHA:

The Kingdoms, by Natasha Pulley
found at Bookshelf Journeys

A time twisting alternative history that asks whether it’s worth changing the past to save the future, even if it costs you everyone you’ve ever loved.

Joe Tournier has a bad case of amnesia. His first memory is of stepping off a train in the nineteenth-century French colony of England. The only clue Joe has about his identity is a century-old postcard of a Scottish lighthouse that arrives in London the same month he does. Written in illegal English—instead of French—the postcard is signed only with the letter “M,” but Joe is certain whoever wrote it knows him far better than he currently knows himself, and he’s determined to find the writer.
The search for M, though, will drive Joe from French-ruled London to rebel-owned Scotland and finally onto the battle ships of a lost empire’s Royal Navy. In the process, Joe will remake history, and himself.

“I am a big fan of alternate history so this gets my interest.”

 



Georgie, All Along, by Kate Clayborn
found at Bookfan

The acclaimed author of Love Lettering weaves a wise and witty new novel that echoes with timely questions about love, career, reconciling with the past, and finding your path while knowing your true worth.

Longtime personal assistant Georgie Mulcahy has made a career out of putting others before herself. When an unexpected upheaval sends her away from her hectic job in L.A. and back to her hometown, Georgie must confront an uncomfortable truth: her own wants and needs have always been a disconcertingly blank page.

But then Georgie comes across a forgotten artifact—a “friendfic” diary she wrote as a teenager, filled with possibilities she once imagined. To an overwhelmed Georgie, the diary’s simple, small-scale ideas are a lifeline—a guidebook for getting started on a new path.

Georgie’s plans hit a snag when she comes face to face with an unexpected roommate—Levi Fanning, onetime town troublemaker and current town hermit. But this quiet, grouchy man is more than just his reputation, and he offers to help Georgie with her quest. As the two make their way through her wishlist, Georgie begins to realize that what she truly wants might not be in the pages of her diary after all, but right by her side—if only they can both find a way to let go of the pasts that hold them back.

Honest and deeply emotional, Georgie, All Along is a smart, tender must-read for everyone who’s ever wondered about the life that got away . . .

“This cover caught my eye and it sounds like it might be a good romance.”

 


 
SERENA:
 

 

Stop Overthinking:
23 Techniques to Relieve Stress,
Stop Negative Spirals,
Declutter Your Mind, and Focus on the Present,
by Nick Trenton
found at The Book Connection

 

Overcome negative thought patterns, reduce stress, and live a worry-free life.

Overthinking is the biggest cause of unhappiness. Don’t get stuck in a never-ending thought loop. Stay present and keep your mind off things that don’t matter, and never will.

Break free of your self-imposed mental prison.

Stop Overthinking is a book that understands where you’ve been through,the exhausting situation you’ve put yourself into, and how you lose your mind in the trap of anxiety and stress. Acclaimed author Nick Trenton will walk you through the obstacles with detailed and proven techniques to help you rewire your brain, control your thoughts, and change your mental habits.What’s more, the book will provide you scientific approaches to completely change the way you think and feel about yourself by ending the vicious thought patterns.

Stop agonizing over the past and trying to predict the future.

Nick Trenton grew up in rural Illinois and is quite literally a farm boy. His best friend growing up was his trusty companion Leonard the dachshund. RIP Leonard. Eventually, he made it off the farm and obtained a BS in Economics, followed by an MA in Behavioral Psychology.

Powerful ways to stop ruminating and dwelling on negative thoughts.

-How to be aware of your negative spiral triggers-Identify and recognize your inner anxieties-How to keep the focus on relaxation and action-Proven methods to overcome stress attacks-Learn to declutter your mind and find focus

Unleash your unlimited potential and start living.

No more self-deprecating talk. No more sleepless nights with racing thoughts. Free your mind from overthinking and achieve more, feel better, and unleash your potential. Finally be able to live in the present moment.

 

“This is something I need right now.”

 


 

Alice has always wanted to be a writer. Her talent is innate, but her stories remain safe and detached, until a devastating event breaks her heart open, and she creates a stunning debut novel. Her words, in turn, find their way to readers, from a teenager hiding her homelessness, to a free diver pushing himself beyond endurance, an artist furious at the world around her, a bookseller in search of love, a widower rent by grief. Each one is drawn into Alice’s novel; each one discovers something different that alters their perspective, and presents new pathways forward for their lives.

Together, their stories reveal how books can affect us in the most beautiful and unexpected of ways—and how we are all more closely connected to one another than we might think.
 
“I’ve loved Erica Bauermeister’s previous books. This one sounds like another winner.”
 
 
📚📚📚
 

What books caught your eye this week?

Mailbox Monday

2 Comments

Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week.

Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles, and humongous wish lists.

Christmas is coming soon! But I have the feeling Santa may have taken the red eye plane and already delivered a few book goodies to your mailbox. Can we see them please?

Tell us about your new books by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back later this week for Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

1 Comment

At Mailbox Monday, we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but also to check out the books received by others. Each week, our team is sharing with you a few Books That Caught Our Eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

It was fun seeing more December-look books this week among your mailboxes, and already some 2023 reading plans!

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

EMMA:

Saha, by Cho Nam-Joo
translated from the Korean by Jamie Chang
found at Sam Still Reading

 

A National Book Award Finalist hailed as “a social treatise as well as a work of art” (Alexandra Alter, New York Times), Kim Jiyoung, Born 1982 announced Cho Nam-Joo as a major literary talent. In her signature sharp prose, brilliantly translated by Jamie Chang, Nam-Joo returns with this haunting account of a neglected housing complex in the shadows of Town: a former fishing village bought out by a massive conglomerate. Town is prosperous and safe—but only if you’re a citizen with “valuable skills and assets,” which the residents of Saha Estates are not. Disenfranchised and tightlipped, the Saha are forced into harsh labor, squatting in moldy units without electricity. Braiding the disparate experiences of the Saha residents—from the reluctant midwife to the unknowing test subject to the separated siblings—into a powerful Orwellian parable, Nam-Joo has crafted a heartbreaking tale of what happens when we finally unmask our oppressors.

 

“I really enjoy international lit, and somehow missed this Korean dystopia,
so to my TBR right away!”

 


Reading the World:
Confessions of a Literary Explorer
, by Ann Morgan
found at The Smell of Ink

In 2012, the world arrived in London for the Olympics…and Ann Morgan went out to meet it. She read her way around all the globe’s 196 independent countries (plus one extra), sampling one book from every nation. It wasn’t easy. Many languages have next to nothing translated into English; there are tiny, tucked-away places where very little is written down at all; some governments don’t like to let works of art leak out to corrupt Westerners.

Her literary adventures shed light on the issues that affect us all: personal, political, national and global. Using her quest as a starting point, this book explores questions such as: What is cultural heritage? How do we define national identity? Is it possible to overcome censorship and propaganda? And how can we celebrate, challenge and change our remarkable world?

 

“I have so much enjoyed Morgan’s first nonfiction book
(The World Between Two Covers)
on her literary adventures in reading the world,
that I want to see what else she draws from her experience.”

 


MARTHA:

MurderSnowedInnMurder at the Snowed Inn by Imogen Plimp
found at The Book Connection.

Heartbroken after her beloved husband’s death, Claire Andersen—proud foster mom, dog mom, and culinary artisan—decides to try her hand at a new beginning, renovating an old B&B in idyllic Galway, Maryland on the edge of the enchanted Appalachian Mountains. She knew her fresh start would be exciting, but she never expected it to be tinged with enthralling adventure, romance that’s sweet as sweet can be … and murder!

Adorable and resilient, former NYC chef Claire Andersen is no stranger to second chances. She and her stock trader husband George had decided long ago to trade in their life of ambition for one of quaint & quiet adventure—by opening up a cozy neighborhood coffee shoppe on the ground floor their Brooklyn brownstone. He was the coffee-connoisseur, she was the baker extraordinaire. Claire was so happy, she could just die. But fate had other plans—it came for her husband instead.

After George’s passing, Claire decides (with a nudge from her doting foster daughter Al) to trade in her life of brews and baked goods for breakfast—bed and breakfast, that is! And what better setting in which to start over than Galway, Maryland—a charming, snowy mountain town (and favorite cross-county ski destination of Claire’s youth).

All is well in Claire’s new B&B venture—and with her new oven constantly in use, it’s mouth-watering, even—until her first guest is murdered in-house. It’s not long until one of the suspects Claire questions about the murder winds up dead, too. Suddenly, Claire finds herself starting over yet again—and trading in her hostess hat (she’d just dusted it off, too!) for a secret life as an amateur sleuth.

But it’s not all B&B business and bodies: Claire also finds herself in the throes of not one, but two potential romances—each more toe-curling and butterflies-in-the-stomach inducing than the other.

Alongside her trusty new pal Evelyn (who’s feisty enough to make anyone blush) and her faithful bloodhound Rupert, Claire races the clock to get to the next victim—before the killer does. And she knows she’d better hurry. Because if the killer catches her first, she might run out of second chances.

“I am being drawn to some of the cozy mysteries.
The author’s warning of a non-binary character didn’t make me less interested..”


EducationinMurder An Education in Murder: A Cozy Mystery
(A Homeschool Cozy Mystery Book 1) by Patty Joy
found at Carstairs Considers.

When a dead body shows up that wasn’t on the lesson plan, a homeschooling mom is the prime suspect.
Rainbow Bailey is happy with her life, homeschooling her five children. Small town life suits her well and she spends contented days juggling her household, science projects, helping her husband, her friends, and planning what comes next.
What she didn’t plan on was murder.
Rainbow is shocked to discover a body in a dumpster. It not only ruins her mom’s night out, but turns her entire world upside down. Things get even bleaker for her when the struggling and frustrated police chief can’t find a better suspect than Rainbow.
Terrified by the prospect of a lifetime in prison for a crime she didn’t commit, it’s up to her and her children to find the true culprit before the killer strikes again.
Will Rainbow and her curious kids crack the case, or will Rainbow take the blame for this heinous crime?
If you like cozy mysteries with a small-town flair, realistic characters and a taste of murder, you’ll love Patty Joy’s Homeschool Cozy Mystery series. Grab your copy of An Education in Murder now!

“Another cozy mystery.
I homeschooled my children for a few years
so that element got my attention.”

 


SERENA:

 

 

  The Loch by Steve Alten
found at The Smell of Ink

 

Marine biologist Zachary Wallace once suffered a near-drowning experience in legendary Loch Ness, and now, long-forgotten memories of that experience have begun haunting him.

The truth surrounding these memories lies with Zachary’s estranged father, Angus Wallace, a wily Highlander on trial for murder.

Together the two plunge into a world where the legend of Loch Ness shows its true face.

“This is an older book,
but I’ve always been fascinated by the myth of the Lock Ness,
and I think this will bring a good dose of reality and mystery with it.”


 

Throughout history, there have been numerous epidemics that have threatened mankind with destruction. Diseases have the ability to highlight our shared concerns across the ages, affecting every social divide from national boundaries, economic categories, racial divisions, and beyond. Whether looking at smallpox, HIV, Ebola, or COVID-19 outbreaks, we see the same conversations arising as society struggles with the all-encompassing question: What do we do now?

In “poignant yet relevant detail” (Niki Kapsambelis, author of The Inheritance), Quarantine Life from Cholera to COVID-19 demonstrates that these conversations have always involved the same questions of individual liberties versus the common good, debates about rushing new and untested treatments, considerations of whether quarantines are effective to begin with, what to do about healthy carriers, and how to keep trade circulating when society shuts down.

This vibrant social and medical history tracks different diseases and outlines their trajectory, what they meant for society, and societal questions each disease brought up, along with practical takeaways we can apply to current and future pandemics—so we can all be better prepared for whatever life throws our way.

“I’ve enjoyed non-fiction about these larger scientific-societal issues in the past.
I think I’m ready to read about pandemics now, so this one might work well.”

 


Saint (The World of the Narrows #0) by Adrienne Young
found at The Infinite Curio

 

As a boy, Elias learned the hard way what happens when you don’t heed the old tales.

Nine years after his lack of superstition got his father killed, he’s grown into a young man of piety, with a deep reverence for the hallowed sea and her fickle favor. As stories of the fisherman’s son who has managed to escape the most deadly of storms spreads from port to port, his devotion to the myths and creeds has given him the reputation of the luckiest bastard to sail the Narrows.

Now, he’s mere days away from getting everything his father ever dreamed for him: a ship of his own, a crew, and a license that names him as one of the first Narrows-born traders. But when a young dredger from the Unnamed Sea with more than one secret crosses his path, Elias’ faith will be tested like never before. The greater the pull he feels toward her, the farther he drifts from the things he’s spent the last three years working for.

He is dangerously close to repeating his mistakes and he’s seen first hand how vicious the jealous sea can be. If he’s going to survive her retribution, he will have to decide which he wants more, the love of the girl who could change their shifting world, or the sacred beliefs that earned him the name that he’s known for—Saint.

“Ok, the first thing that caught my eye about this book
was the blue eyes in the book cover.
They are arresting, aren’t they?
But there’s something about this description of his lack of superstition
and his new respect for the sea
that just makes me interested in seeing what happens.”

📚📚📚

What books caught your eye this week?

Mailbox Monday

6 Comments

Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week.

Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles, and humongous wish lists.

It’s getting cold out there, time to pile more books and get under your covers. What good books did you get in your mailbox?

Tell us about your new books by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back later this week for Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

4 Comments

At Mailbox Monday, we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but also to check out the books received by others. Each week, our team is sharing with you a few Books That Caught Our Eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We are already in December, so this is my first time to post here. I’m thrilled to share with you what caught our eye this week.
A great way to fine tune your book list for Santa!

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

EMMA:

 

Homecoming, by Kate Morton,
found at Book’d Out

 

Adelaide Hills, Christmas Eve, 1959: At the end of a scorching hot day, beside a creek on the grounds of the grand and mysterious mansion, a local delivery man makes a terrible discovery. A police investigation is called and the small town of Tambilla becomes embroiled in one of the most shocking and perplexing murder cases in the history of South Australia.Sixty years later, Jess is a journalist in search of a story. Having lived and worked in London for almost twenty years, she now finds herself laid off from her full-time job and struggling to make ends meet. A phone call out of nowhere summons her back to Sydney, where her beloved grandmother, Nora, who raised Jess when her mother could not, has suffered a fall and been raced to the hospital.Nora has always been a vibrant and strong presence: decisive, encouraging, young despite her years. When Jess visits her in the hospital, she is alarmed to find her grandmother frail and confused. It’s even more alarming to hear from Nora’s housekeeper that Nora had been distracted in the weeks before her accident and had fallen on the steps to the attic—the one place Jess was forbidden from playing in when she was small.

At loose ends in Nora’s house, Jess does some digging of her own. In Nora’s bedroom, she discovers a true crime book, chronicling the police investigation into a long-buried tragedy: the Turner Family Tragedy of Christmas Eve, 1959. It is only when Jess skims through the book that she finds a shocking connection between her own family and this once-infamous crime—a crime that has never been resolved satisfactorily. And for a journalist without a story, a cold case might be the best distraction she can find…

An epic novel that spans generations, Homecoming asks what we would do for those we love, and how we protect the lies we tell. It explores the power of motherhood, the corrosive effects of tightly held secrets, and the healing nature of truth. Above all, it is a beguiling and immensely satisfying novel from one of the finest writers working today.

 
“I have devoured all of Morton’s books. So cool to see a new one to come out next April.
And… it’s available on Netgalley!!”

 


 

It is once again up to American markswoman Kate Rees to take the shot that just might win—or lose—World War II, in the followup to national bestseller Three Hours in Paris.

Three missions. Two cities. One shot to win the war.

October 1942: it’s been two years since American markswoman Kate Rees was sent to Paris on a British Secret Service mission to assassinate Hitler. Since then, she has left spycraft behind to take a training job as a sharpshooting instructor in the Scottish Highlands. But her quiet life is violently disrupted when Colonel Stepney, her former handler, drags her back into the fray for a dangerous three-pronged mission in Paris.

Each task is more dangerous than the next: Deliver a package of penicillin to sick children. Assassinate a high-ranking German operative whose knowledge of secret invasion plans could turn the tide of the war against the Allies. Rescue a British agent who once saved Kate’s life, and get out.

Kate will encounter sheiks and spies, poets and partisans, as she races to keep up with the constantly-shifting nature of her assignment, showing every ounce of her Oregonian grit in the process.

New York Times bestselling author Cara Black has crafted another heart-stopping thrill-ride that reveals a portrait of Paris at the height of the Nazi Occupation.–

Three Hours in Paris was Cara Black’s foray into historical mystery,
and it was fabulous. So cool to see a sequel!”

 


MARTHA:

 

The Stationmaster’s Cottage by Phillipa Nefri Clark
found at The Book Connection.

Christie is happy in her life… or so she tells herself. Despite a tragic childhood, she has built a satisfying career and loves her city apartment. But deep down she yearns for a simpler life. Family. A garden. And a place to heal her heart.

The decision to attend a funeral in a town she’s never heard of throws her safe world into disarray, exposing the cracks in her life. As she deals with the fallout, Christie moves into a rundown cottage she’s inherited and there, makes a discovery.

Fifty years ago, a heartbroken young artist waited each dawn on a jetty for his true love to return. And each night, he wrote her a love letter.

What Christie uncovers will change her life forever.

“I was drawn by the lovely cover and I like historical romance.”


A Death in Tokyo by Keigo Higashino,
Giles Murray (Translator)
found at Book Dilettante.

In the latest from international bestselling author Keigo Higashino, Tokyo Police Detective Kaga is faced with a very public murder that doesn’t quite add up, a prime suspect unable to defend himself, and pressure from the highest levels for a quick solution.

In the Nihonbashi district of Tokyo an unusual statue of a Japanese mythic beast – a kirin – stands guard over the district from the classic Nihonbashi bridge. In the evening, a man who appears to be very drunk staggers onto the bridge and collapses right under the statue of the winged beast. The patrolman who sees this scene unfold, goes to rouse the man, only to discover that the man was not passed out, he was dead; that he was not drunk, he was stabbed in the chest. However, where he died was not where the crime was committed – the key to solving the crime is to find out where he was attacked and why he made such a super human effort to carry himself to the Nihonbashi Bridge. That same night, a young man named Yashima is injured in a car accident while attempting to flee from the police. Found on him is the wallet of the murdered man.

Tokyo Police Detective Kyoichiro Kaga is assigned to the team investigating the murder – and must bring his skills to bear to uncover what actually happened that night on the Nihonbashi bridge. What, if any, connection is there between the murdered man and Yashima, the young man caught with his wallet? Kaga’s investigation takes him down dark roads and into the unknown past to uncover what really happened and why.

A Death in Tokyo is another mind-bending mystery from the modern master of classic crime, finalist for both an Edgar Award and a CWA Dagger, the internationally bestselling Keigo Higashino.

“I like police procedurals and this got my interest in the series.”

 


 

SERENA:

 

Happy Place by Emily Henry
foud at Book’d Out

 

Harriet and Wyn have been the perfect couple since they met in college—they go together like salt and pepper, honey and tea, lobster and rolls. Except, now—for reasons they’re still not discussing—they don’t.

They broke up five months ago. And still haven’t told their best friends.

Which is how they find themselves sharing a bedroom at the Maine cottage that has been their friend group’s yearly getaway for the last decade. Their annual respite from the world, where for one vibrant, blissful week they leave behind their daily lives; have copious amounts of cheese, wine, and seafood; and soak up the salty coastal air with the people who understand them most.

Only this year, Harriet and Wyn are lying through their teeth while trying not to notice how desperately they still want each other. Because the cottage is for sale and this is the last week they’ll all have together in this place. They can’t stand to break their friends’ hearts, and so they’ll play their parts. Harriet will be the driven surgical resident who never starts a fight, and Wyn will be the laid-back charmer who never lets the cracks show. It’s a flawless plan (if you look at it from a great distance and through a pair of sunscreen-smeared sunglasses). After years of being in love, how hard can it be to fake it for one week…in front of those who know you best?

“These Emily Henry books are always funny and entertaining.
They seem to make me happier when I read them, so I’d like to get this one on audio.”

 


 

 Yeva Skalietska, a girl living in the city of Kharkiv, turned 12 on February 14, 2022—a happy day. Ten days later, the only life she’d ever known was irrevocably shattered. On February 24, her city was suddenly under attack as Russia launched its horrifying invasion of Ukraine. Yeva and her family ran to a basement bunker, where she began writing a diary. She describes the bombings they endured while sheltering underground, and their desperate journey west to escape the conflict raging around them. After many endless train rides and a prolonged stay in an overcrowded refugee center in Western Ukraine, Yeva and her beloved grandmother eventually find refuge in Dublin. There, she bravely begins to forge a new life, hoping she’ll be able to return home one day.

 

“This crisis in Ukraine has me very concerned,
especially when daughters similar in age to my own
are fleeing their home countries in order to be safe from harm and war.”

 

📚📚📚

 

What books caught your eye this week?

Books That Caught Our Eye

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At Mailbox Monday, we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but also to check out the books received by others. Each week, our team is sharing with you a few Books That Caught Our Eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

I hope you have all found some new books in this week’s posts to add to your end of year wish lists!

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

EMMA:

Lonely Castle in the Mirror, by Mizuki Tsujimura
found at vvb32reads

Seven students are avoiding going to school, hiding in their darkened bedrooms, unable to face their family and friends, until the moment they discover a portal into another world that offers temporary escape from their stressful lives. Passing through a glowing mirror, they gather in a magnificent castle which becomes their playground and refuge during school hours. The students are tasked with locating a key, hidden somewhere in the castle, that will allow whoever finds it to be granted one wish.

At this moment, the castle will vanish, along with all memories they may have of their adventure. If they fail to leave the castle by 5 pm every afternoon, they will be eaten by the keeper of the castle, an easily provoked and shrill creature named the Wolf Queen.

Delving into their emotional lives with sympathy and a generous warmth, Lonely Castle in the Mirror shows the unexpected rewards of reaching out to others. Exploring vivid human stories with a twisty and puzzle-like plot, this heart-warming novel is full of joy and hope for anyone touched by sadness and vulnerability.

“I love Japanese literature, so this one is definitely on my TBR!
It will be perfect for next Japanese Literature Challenge (January-March 2023)”

 


The Couple at the Table, by Sophie Hannah
found at An Interior Journey

Honeymooners at a posh resort receive an ominous warning with deadly consequences in the latest gripping, twisty psychological thriller from New York Times bestselling author Sophie Hannah.
Jane and William are enjoying their honeymoon at an exclusive couples-only resort…

…until Jane receives a chilling note warning her to “Beware of the couple at the table nearest to yours.” At dinner that night, five other couples are present, and none of their tables is any nearer or farther away than any of the others. It’s almost as if someone has set the scene in order to make the warning note meaningless–but why would anyone do that?
Jane has no idea.
But someone in this dining room will be dead before breakfast, and all the evidence will suggest that no one there that night could have possibly committed the crime.

“I have always been impressed by Sophie Hannah‘s writing.
But I haven’t read any of this series, and this is already #11! It’s high time to catch up!”

MARTHA:

Christmas Past by Brian Earl
found at Carstairs Considers.

Behind every Christmas tradition is a story — usually, a forgotten one. Each year, as we decorate a tree, build a gingerbread house, and get ready for a visit from St. Nicholas, we’re continuing generations-old narratives, while being largely unaware of their starting chapters. But knowing how these traditions began adds a new level of depth to our Christmas spirit, as well as an arsenal of anecdotes to share at Christmas parties.

Christmas Past: The Fascinating Stories Behind Our Favorite Holiday’s Traditions reveals the surprising, quirky, mysterious, and sometimes horrifying stories behind the most wonderful time of the year. With 26 short chapters, it’s a festive, digestible Advent calendar of a book.

Covering traditions ancient and modern, Christmas Past is filled with stories of happy accidents, cultural histories, criminal capers (including tomb raiders and con artists), and hidden connections between Christmas and broader social, economic, and technological influences. How did the invention of plate glass forever change the Christmas season? What common Christmas item helped introduce fine art to the masses? Why do Americans typically spike their eggnog with rum, rather than the traditional brandy? And speaking of booze, does using the phrase “Merry Christmas” mark you as a drunken reveler?

Christmas Past answers all of those questions, and many more.

“I celebrate the original ‘reason for the season’,
but I’d like to know the history of the many Christmas traditions.”

 


 

Shadows We Remain by Mose J. Gingerich,
found at Bookshelf Journeys.

Private investigator Bruce Ellsworth is familiar with the Amish.
In his previous job as Sheriff in Castleton, Illinois, he was occasionally summoned to the nearby Amish community of Caroline Creek to solve a minor disagreement.

But when an Amish family arrives at his office seeking help in finding their missing son, Bruce quickly finds himself caught up in a tangled web of FBI informants, Mafiosos, and secret societies that threaten to upend his whole world – and possibly get him killed.

 

“I like stories about the Amish and this Christian thriller sounds like a good story.”

 

What books caught your eye this week?