Mailbox Monday

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sunflowermailbox-sml_img_2937_edited-2Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

How has everyone been doing? Social distancing? Isolating? Going to work? Please share your stories and we can commiserate together. I don’t know what we have in store for us in the coming weeks, but I do want to say that this time at home without rushing around has had me appreciating the little things. I have enjoyed playing board games with my daughter, watching her talk to her friends on video chat, and seeing her ask curious questions when her grandpa does a project in the basement. She does miss going to school and her friends, but so far, we haven’t had any major meltdowns. She’s faring better than some of the adults in the house. Those parents of mine are going stir crazy and my husband is bored, even though he’s the one still required to go to the office.

I hope everyone had found something to call their attention. Any good books?

Hope everyone had a good week. Tell us about your new books by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back later this week for Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

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dragonlegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Every Wednesday we will each share two books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.
MARTHA:
The Shadows Between Us by Tricia Levenseller found at The Infinite Curio.

Alessandra is tired of being overlooked, but she has a plan to gain power:

1) Woo the Shadow King.
2) Marry him.
3) Kill him and take his kingdom for herself.

No one knows the extent of the freshly crowned Shadow King’s power. Some say he can command the shadows that swirl around him to do his bidding. Others say they speak to him, whispering the thoughts of his enemies. Regardless, Alessandra knows what she deserves, and she’s going to do everything within her power to get it.

But Alessandra’s not the only one trying to kill the king. As attempts on his life are made, she finds herself trying to keep him alive long enough for him to make her his queen—all while struggling not to lose her heart. After all, who better for a Shadow King than a cunning, villainous queen?

“This sounds like a clever fantasy conflict.”

——–

Second Sister by Chan Ho-Kei, Jeremy Tiang (Translator) found at Fiction Reads.

Chan Ho-Kei’s The Borrowed was one of the most acclaimed international crime novels of recent years, a vivid and compelling tale of power, corruption, and the law spanning five decades of the history of Hong Kong. Now he delivers Second Sister, an up-to-the-minute tale of a Darwinian digital city where everyone from tech entrepreneurs to teenagers is struggling for the top.

A schoolgirl—Siu-Man—has committed suicide, leaping from her twenty-second floor window to the pavement below. Siu-Man is an orphan and the librarian older sister who’s been raising her refuses to believe there was no foul play—nothing seemed amiss. She contacts a man known only as N.—a hacker, and an expert in cybersecurity and manipulating human behavior. But can Nga-Yee interest him sufficiently to take her case, and can she afford it if he says yes?

What follows is a cat and mouse game through the city of Hong Kong and its digital underground, especially an online gossip platform, where someone has been slandering Siu-Man. The novel is also populated by a man harassing girls on mass transit; high school kids, with their competing agendas and social dramas; a Hong Kong digital company courting an American venture capitalist; and the Triads, market women and noodle shop proprietors who frequent N.’s neighborhood of Sai Wan. In the end it all comes together to tell us who caused Siu-Man’s death and why, and to ask, in a world where online and offline dialogue has increasingly forgotten about the real people on the other end, what the proper punishment is.

“This tense thriller caught my eye.”

——–

SERENA:

The Kids Are Gonna Ask by Gretchen Anthony at Bookfan.

The death of Thomas and Savannah McClair’s mother turns their world upside down. Raised to be fiercely curious by their grandmother Maggie, the twins become determined to learn the identity of their biological father. And when their mission goes viral, an eccentric producer offers them a dream platform: a fully sponsored podcast called The Kids Are Gonna Ask. To discover the truth, Thomas and Savannah begin interviewing people from their mother’s past and are shocked when the podcast ignites in popularity. As the attention mounts, they get caught in a national debate they never asked for—but nothing compares to the mayhem that ensues when they find him.

I like the idea of finding a parent you haven’t know before, but I also know the journey of connecting with lost family can be disappointing.

Social Leads: Your Social Media Playbook by Shay Banks at An Imperfect Christian Mom.

Social media allows entrepreneurs to earn money without spending thousands of dollars on print, TV, radio, and costly out-of-home advertisements. The pervasiveness of this new medium allows you to get leads. And as you already know, the more leads you have, the more you can earn.

But the problem is, most businesses do not know how to wield social media and its tools to their advantage. As a result, they lose thousands of dollars without even knowing about it.

Triple the leads you get from social media in less than 90 days with Shay Banks’ Social Leads!

I’m always on the lookout for social media advice. Despite having used it for years, the understanding of how it works continues to elude me.

What Books Caught Your Eyes This Week?

Mailbox Monday

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photo-1534567406103-997f6c5e7f93Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

This is the beginning of week 2 with no school for my daughter and my offices officially are working remotely as of last week. I’ve worked at home for eight years, and while it can be challenging, the introvert in me enjoys the solitude. With my daughter home and (as of now) no concrete online class plans in place, we’re reviewing her curriculum up to now so she doesn’t forget what she’s learned. I’ve given her time during the day to do art as she wants and physical education (which is some times yoga, sometimes swim team workouts, and soon soccer practices).

She’s keeping busy, but I feel exhausted more than usual, especially as all my work content writing is focused on COVID-19. I hope that everyone is being safe, washing their hands, and spending quality time with their families and checking in on those who need it.

Now, what’s everyone been reading to take their minds off the outside world? 

Hope everyone had a good week. Tell us about your new books by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

 

Be sure to stop back later this week for Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

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dragonlegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Every Wednesday we will each share two books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

MARTHA:

The Lost Jewels by Kirsty Manning found at Sam Still Reading.

Why would someone bury a bucket of precious jewels and gemstones and never return? 

Present Day. When respected American jewelry historian, Kate Kirby, receives a call about the Cheapside jewels, she knows she’s on the brink of the experience of a lifetime.

But the trip to London forces Kate to explore secrets that have long been buried by her own family. Back in Boston, Kate has uncovered a series of sketches in her great-grandmother’s papers linking her suffragette great-grandmother Essie to the Cheapside collection. Could these sketches hold the key to Essie’s secret life in Edwardian London?

In the summer of 1912, impoverished Irish immigrant Essie Murphy happens to be visiting her brother when a workman’s pickaxe strikes through the floor of an old tenement house in Cheapside, near St. Paul’s Cathedral in London. The workmen uncover a stash of treasure—from Ottoman pendants to Elizabethan and Jacobean gems—and then the finds disappear again! Could these jewels—one in particular—change the fortunes of Essie and her sisters?

Together with photographer Marcus Holt, Kate Kirby chases the history of the Cheapside gems and jewels, especially the story of a small diamond champlevé enamel ring. Soon, everything Kate believes about her family, gemology, and herself will be threatened.

Based on a fascinating true story, The Lost Jewels is a riveting historical fiction novel that will captivate readers from the beginning to the unforgettable, surprising end.

“Jewels and mystery sound like a good mix to catch my eye.”

The Last Train to Key West by Chanel Cleeton found at BermudaOnion’s Weblog.

In 1935 three women are forever changed when one of the most powerful hurricanes in history barrels toward the Florida Keys.
 
For the tourists traveling on Henry Flagler’s legendary Overseas Railroad, Labor Day weekend is an opportunity to forget the economic depression gripping the nation. But one person’s paradise can be another’s prison, and Key West-native Helen Berner yearns to escape.

After the Cuban Revolution of 1933 leaves Mirta Perez’s family in a precarious position, she agrees to an arranged marriage with a notorious American. Following her wedding in Havana, Mirta arrives in the Keys on her honeymoon. While she can’t deny the growing attraction to her new husband, his illicit business interests may threaten not only her relationship, but her life.

Elizabeth Preston’s trip to Key West is a chance to save her once-wealthy family from their troubles after the Wall Street crash. Her quest takes her to the camps occupied by veterans of the Great War and pairs her with an unlikely ally on a treacherous hunt of his own.

Over the course of the holiday weekend, the women’s paths cross unexpectedly, and the danger swirling around them is matched only by the terrifying force of the deadly storm threatening the Keys.

“I have an interest in hurricanes and history.”

SERENA:

Coding Capers by Angela Cleveland and Tamara Zentic from Reviews by Martha’s Bookshelves.

Join Luci and her friends as they go on an adventure to find a missing robot! In the process they learn the foundational concepts of coding, the increasing capabilities of technology, and the power of persistence.

Was it just a dream?! Luci wakes up after dreaming about robots only to learn that her teacher has a robot emergency at school! The class robot has disappeared, and the students must decipher codes to locate it, reprogram it, and return it.

We huddled together. “Hurry! Read the card!”

Go to the gym where you’ll find a maze,

Up and down and then sideways,

Over and over with your group,

Not a pattern, but a ______.

This STEM-friendly tale takes children on a fun game of hide and seek that teaches coding terminology and how technology and computer science work together to create and manage so many of the things we use in our daily lives.

With a little ingenuity and a lot of perseverance, Luci and her friends follow the clues and end up with a surprise that will allow each of them to help others and inspire the next generation of leaders.

“This looks like something I might need for my daughter while she is out of school.”

The other two books I had on my list are in Martha’s list this week!

What Books Caught Your Eyes This Week?

Mailbox Monday

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sunflowermailbox-sml_img_2937_edited-2Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

This week has been super busy at work, especially with all the coronavirus messaging prep and figuring our how to keep the engine running if everyone is working from home. Our schools are talking about closing and moving classes online, which I think is fine for older children, but elementary school kids may be less motivated and focused. We’ll see what the future holds. Fingers crossed things do not get as bad as some say they will.

Hope everyone had a good week. Tell us about your new books by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back later this week for Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

4 Comments

dragonlegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Every Wednesday we will each share two books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

MARTHA:

Don’t Look for Me by Wendy Walker found at Words and Peace.

The greatest risk isn’t running away.

It’s running out of time.

The car abandoned miles from home.

The note found at a nearby hotel.

The shattered family that couldn’t be put back together.

They called it a “walk away.”

It happens all the time.

Women disappear, desperate to leave their lives behind and start over.

But is that what really happened to Molly Clarke?

“This looks like a really good thriller.”

The True Story of Zippy Chippy: The Little Horse That Couldn’t by Artie Bennett, Dave Szalay (Illustrations) found at Library of Clean Reads.

A true story about the famed racehorse who lost every race but won everyone’s heart.

The bell rings and they’re off! Zippy the racehorse—descended from legends—is destined for glory, but when the other horses bolt from the gate . . . Zippy stands still. When people try to pet him . . . he bites their hats and escapes from his stall. What’s an owner to do? Keep on trying! After all, Zippy has become part of Felix’s family—and a close friend of his little daughter. And after 100 straight losses, Zippy shows everyone that—win, lose, or draw—it takes guts to compete and that you can lose and lose and still be a winner.

“I love horse stories and never heard of this sad, but loved, racehorse.”

SERENA:

Hello Summer by Mary Kay Andrews at Bookfan and BermudaOnion.

Conley Hawkins left her family’s small town newspaper, The Silver Bay Beacon, in the rearview mirror years ago. Now a star reporter for a big-city paper, Conley is exactly where she wants to be and is about to take a fancy new position in Washington, D.C. Or so she thinks.

For small town scandals…

When the new job goes up in smoke, Conley finds herself right back where she started, working for her sister, who is trying to keep The Silver Bay Beacon afloat—and she doesn’t exactly have warm feelings for Conley. Soon she is given the unenviable task of overseeing the local gossip column, “Hello, Summer.”

And big-time secrets.

Then Conley witnesses an accident that ends in the death of a local congressman—a beloved war hero with a shady past. The more she digs into the story, the more dangerous it gets. As an old heartbreaker causes trouble and a new flame ignites, it soon looks like their sleepy beach town is the most scandalous hotspot of the summer.

“I just love Mary Kay Andrews’ books. They are great escapes, and a summer book is just what I need to get out of the doldrums.”

Talking with Psychopaths and Savages Beyond Evil by Christopher Berry-Dee at Just Me Mrs. D.

Sunday Times bestselling author Christopher Berry-Dee is back with a companion volume that delves even deeper into the savage world of psychopaths and their hideous crimes.

Talking With Psychopaths and Savages was the UK’s bestselling true-crime title of 2017, and he is now the country’s No. 1 true-crime author.

Includes many of the author’s unique first-hand interviews and correspondence with convicted serial killers, proving that the world’s most monstrous killers may be much closer than we think . . .

“This sounds like ti would be very eye-opening.”

What books caught your eyes?

Mailbox Monday

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mailboxesMailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

Happy birthday to my daughter today, and I hope those of you who practice it, remember to turn the clocks forward one hour. Daylight savings time is here.

Hope everyone had a good week. Tell us about your new books by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back later this week for Books That Caught Our Eye.