Mailbox Monday

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Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

Another week has passed in September, and it is hard to believe that this is the last week of the month. Seriously, where is the time going if we’re all home? I feel like we haven’t done anything, but we’re all so exhausted from Zooming around the internet. Yes, still reading kids books and trying to recruit poets for our local book festival. So I am doing things, but mostly from home these days. How have you been?

Tell us about your new books by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back later this week for Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

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At Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Each week will share a few books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

MARTHA:

Cover your Tracks by Daco S. Auffenorde found at Silver’s Reviews.

Margo Fletcher, eight months pregnant, is traveling by train from Chicago to Spokane, her childhood home. While passing through an isolated portion of the Rockies in blizzard conditions, the train unexpectedly brakes. Up ahead, deadly snow from a massive avalanche plummets down the mountain. Despite the conductor’s order for the passengers to stay seated, former Army Ranger Nick Eliot insists that survival depends on moving to the back of the train. Only Margo believes him. They take refuge in the last train car, which Nick heroically uncouples in time to avoid the avalanche. The rest of the train is hurled down the mountainside and is soon lost forever in a blanket of snow. Margo and Nick, the sole survivors, are stranded in the snowstorm without food, water, or heat. Rescuers might not arrive for days.

When the weather turns violent again, the pair must flee the shelter of the passenger car and run for their lives into the wilderness. They must fend off the deadly cold as well as predatory wild animals foraging for food. Eventually, Nick leads Margo to shelter in a watchtower atop a mountain. There, we learn that both Margo and Nick have secrets that have brought them together and threaten to destroy them.

Cover Your Tracks is a chilling story of love and hate, the devastating power of nature, and the will to survive.

“I was drawn by the cover and then the blurb of this suspense.”

Trini’s Big Leap by Beth Kephart, Alexander de Wit, William Sulit (Illustrations) found at Savvy Verse & Wit.

Trini is the highest flyer, the strongest gripper, the most spectacular cartwheeler at her after-school club.

She easily masters any gymnastic move her teachers show her, and always says, “I can do that.” But when she tries to construct buildings out of blocks like her friends do, she discovers that some things don’t come as easily for her. Through the encouragement of her friends, Trini learns the value of collaboration and trying new things, even when they aren’t so easy. An afterword by the founder and CEO of The Little Gym Europe, outlines why it’s important to encourage children to try new and difficult things.

“There were several children’s books at Savvy that caught my eye. I particularly like the message of this one.”

SERENA:

Tangled in Ivy by Ashley Farley at Library of Clean Reads.

Lillian Alexander has never understood why her twin sister hates her so much. Layla’s animosity stems from childhood, from their mother’s death twenty-seven years ago. But Lillian remembers nothing about that day. Why, if her mother’s death was an accident, does Lillian harbor guilt, as though she were somehow to blame?

Lillian discovers a thumb drive, marked for her eyes only, in her recently deceased father’s study. Graham’s account of his stormy relationship with her mother stirs long-suppressed memories and divulges information about Lillian’s past that sets her on a journey of self-discovery.

After a whirlwind courtship and fairy tale marriage, Graham’s honeymoon with Ivy is short-lived. When tragedy strikes, Ivy sinks into the depths of despair, refusing to see anyone but her childhood best friend. Resentful of the strange hold Alice has over his wife, discouraged by Ivy’s persistent despondency, Graham turns elsewhere for comfort, spawning events that forever alter the course of their lives.

When the Alexander sisters learn the family fortune is gone, the rift between Lillian and her sister deepens as Lillian fights to save her family’s ancestral on Charleston’s prestigious East Battery. Ghosts from the past resurface and truths are revealed, leading to a dramatic conclusion not soon forgotten.

“I was first drawn to the beautiful cover on this one, but this story sounds intriguing.”

What Books Caught Your Eyes This Week?

Mailbox Monday

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Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

Nothing much has changed here since last week. Reading has slowed of adult books and picked up with kids books. Reading together means more is read by her and less by me, but if it helps her gain some ground, I’m all for it. I hope everyone has something to look forward to these days. I’m looking forward to my week off in October — maybe then I’ll have time for adult reading.

Tell us about your new books by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back later this week for Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

3 Comments

At Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Each week will share a few books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

MARTHA:

Making Sense of God by Timothy Keller found at Reviews from the Stacks.

Making Sense of God: An Invitation to the Skeptical, is a prequel to The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism.

We live in an age of skepticism. Our society places such faith in empirical reason, historical progress, and heartfelt emotion that it’s easy to wonder: Why should anyone believe in Christianity? What role can faith and religion play in our modern lives?

In this thoughtful and inspiring new book, pastor and New York Times bestselling author Timothy Keller invites skeptics to consider that Christianity is more relevant now than ever. As human beings, we cannot live without meaning, satisfaction, freedom, identity, justice, and hope. Christianity provides us with unsurpassed resources to meet these needs. Written for both the ardent believer and the skeptic, Making Sense of God shines a light on the profound value and importance of Christianity in our lives.

“As a committed believer, a book to reach skeptics gets my interest.”

StormBeat: A Journalist Reports from the Oregon Coast by Lori Tobias found at RoseCity Reader.

Journalist Lori Tobias arrived on the Oregon coast in 2000. After freelancing from Newport for several years, she signed on with the Oregonian as a stringer covering the coast from Florence to Astoria; later she would be hired as a staff writer responsible for the entire coast–one person for more than three hundred miles. The job meant long hours, being called out for storms in the middle of the night in dangerous conditions, and driving hundreds of miles in a day if stories called for it. The Oregon coast is a rugged, beautiful place known for its dramatic landscapes and fierce storms. Separated from the state’s population centers by the Coast Range, it is a land of small towns reliant primarily on fishing and tourism. Many of the stories Tobias covered were tragedies: car crashes, falls, drownings, capsizings. And those were just the accidents; Tobias covered plenty of violent crimes as well, such as the infamous Christian Longo murders of 2001. Tobias’s story is as much her own as it is the coast’s, and she takes the reader through familiar beats of life–learning to live on and cover the coast, regular trips back east as her parents age, the decline of journalism in the twenty-first century–and the unexpected, often unglamorous experiences of a working reporter, such as a bout of vertigo after rappelling from a helicopter. Storm Beat tells a compelling story of a land that many visit but few truly know.

“Journalism has changed extremely since I was taught the rules of “Who, What, Where, When and How”. I think I would find this memoir interesting.”

SERENA:

Fifteen: A Compilation of Poems by Amie Woleslagle at Reviews from the Stacks.

You’re not alone.

You’re not the only person who struggles with mental health issues, not the only person with
demons floating in your mind. Amie Woleslagle wrote Fifteen because she deals with them as
well. Not to fix your pain, but to reach out and hold your hand. To remind you that you are not
alone, to ask you to stay and make the world a better place. Because the world will never be the
same without you and your unique take on life. Fifteen is a book of poems crafted from one
teenager dealing with mental health issues to another teenager in the same place. It walks
through the battle of pretending to be okay, of having people you thought were trustworthy
shatter your heart, and the battle of not giving in when your brain has given up. Fifteen covers
true friendships, embracing joy, self acceptance, and living your faith while struggling with
mental illness, all the while showing that, in the end, flowers will bloom in the ashes of your pain.

“I’m always on the lookout for new poetry collections.”

The Midnight Library by Matt Haig at Wanders With a Book.

Somewhere out beyond the edge of the universe there is a library that contains an infinite number of books, each one the story of another reality. One tells the story of your life as it is, along with another book for the other life you could have lived if you had made a different choice at any point in your life. While we all wonder how our lives might have been, what if you had the chance to go to the library and see for yourself? Would any of these other lives truly be better?

In The Midnight Library, Matt Haig’s enchanting new novel, Nora Seed finds herself faced with this decision. Faced with the possibility of changing her life for a new one, following a different career, undoing old breakups, realizing her dreams of becoming a glaciologist; she must search within herself as she travels through the Midnight Library to decide what is truly fulfilling in life, and what makes it worth living in the first place.

“This sounds intriguing.”

What books caught your eyes this week?

Mailbox Monday

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Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

We’re getting into the swing of things with distance learning and swim practices indoors, which involve a lot of protocols, masks, and social distancing. It’s a very cautious time, but I’m optimistic that things are moving in the right direction. I hope everyone is well where they are and that your reading is going better than mine. Slow going here.

Tell us about your new books by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back later this week for Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

2 Comments

At Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Each week will share a few books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

MARTHA:

All the Children Are Home by Patry Francis found at Book Reviews by Linda Moore.

Author of THE ORPHANS OF RACE POINT Patry Francis’s ALL THE CHILDREN ARE HOME, about a family of foster children who learn from their complicated matriarch to find courage and the resiliency to save themselves and each other.

“For some reason I am drawn to stories about orphans – especially as they succeed in life.”

The Whisper Man by Alex North found at Wanders with a Book.

In this dark, suspenseful thriller, Alex North weaves a multi-generational tale of a father and son caught in the crosshairs of an investigation to catch a serial killer preying on a small town.

After the sudden death of his wife, Tom Kennedy believes a fresh start will help him and his young son Jake heal. A new beginning, a new house, a new town. Featherbank.

But the town has a dark past. Twenty years ago, a serial killer abducted and murdered five residents. Until Frank Carter was finally caught, he was nicknamed “The Whisper Man,” for he would lure his victims out by whispering at their windows at night.

Just as Tom and Jake settle into their new home, a young boy vanishes. His disappearance bears an unnerving resemblance to Frank Carter’s crimes, reigniting old rumors that he preyed with an accomplice. Now, detectives Amanda Beck and Pete Willis must find the boy before it is too late, even if that means Pete has to revisit his great foe in prison: The Whisper Man.

And then Jake begins acting strangely. He hears a whispering at his window…

“I’m not always a fan of dark stories but this one, whose blurb made me think of Silence of the Lambs, caught my eye.”

SERENA:

The Girl with the Leica by Helena Janeczek at vvb32 reads.

1st August 1937. A parade of red flags marches through Paris. It is the funeral procession for Gerda Taro, the first female photographer to be killed on a battlefield. Robert Capa, who leads the procession, is devastated. They have been happy together: he taught her how to use the Leica before they left together to fight in the Spanish Civil War.

“I haven’t read any translations lately, but this one sounds intriguing. Plus, it’s pre-WWII and about a female photographer killed during battle.”

The Sea Gate by Jane Johnson at Library of Clean Reads.

After Rebecca’s mother dies, she must sort through her empty flat and come to terms with her loss. As she goes through her mother’s mail, she finds a handwritten envelope. In it is a letter that will change her life forever.

Olivia, her mother’s elderly cousin, needs help to save her beloved home. Rebecca immediately goes to visit Olivia in Cornwall only to find a house full of secrets—treasures in the attic and a mysterious tunnel leading from the cellar to the sea, and Olivia, nowhere to be found.

As it turns out, the old woman is stuck in hospital with no hope of being discharged until her house is made habitable again. Rebecca sets to work restoring the home to its former glory, but as she peels back the layers of paint and grime, she uncovers even more buried secrets—secrets from a time when the Second World War was raging, when Olivia was a young woman, and when both romance and danger lurked around every corner…

A sweeping and utterly spellbinding tale of a young woman’s courage in the face of war and the lengths to which she’ll go to protect those she loves against the most unexpected of enemies.

“Yes, WWII. Plus, there are buried secrets.”

What books caught your eyes this week?

Mailbox Monday

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Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

Happy Monday! It’s hard to believe that it is already Labor Day weekend and that my daughter already had her first week of virtual learning. It was a week of navigating technology, meeting new teachers, and learning some things that they didn’t really get to last year. She’s been a trooper but believe me there are days when we all just want to cry and be hugged.

Tell us about your new books by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back later this week for Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

2 Comments

At Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Each week will share a few books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

MARTHA:

The Rules of Contagion by Adam Kucharski found at Sam Still Reading.

A deadly virus suddenly explodes into the population. A political movement gathers pace, and then quickly vanishes. An idea takes off like wildfire, changing our world forever. We live in a world that’s more interconnected than ever before. Our lives are shaped by outbreaks – of disease, of misinformation, even of violence – that appear, spread and fade away with bewildering speed. To understand them, we need to learn the hidden laws that govern them. From ‘superspreaders’ who might spark a pandemic or bring down a financial system to the social dynamics that make loneliness catch on, The Rules of Contagion offers compelling insights into human behaviour and explains how we can get better at predicting what happens next.

Along the way, Adam Kucharski explores how innovations spread through friendship networks, what links computer viruses with folk stories – and why the most useful predictions aren’t necessarily the ones that come true.

The Night Whistler by Greg Woodland found at The Burgeoning Bookshelf.

It’s 1966. Hal and his little brother, newly arrived in Moorabool with their parents, are exploring the creek near their new home when they find the body of a dog.

Not just dead, but recently killed.

Not just killed, but mutilated.

Constable Mick Goodenough, recently demoted from his city job as a detective, is also new in town—and one of his dogs has gone missing. He’s experienced enough to know what it means when someone tortures an animal to death: it means they’re practising. So when Hal’s mother starts getting anonymous calls—a man whistling, then hanging up—Goodenough, alone among the Moorabool cops, takes her seriously.

The question is: will that be enough to keep her safe?

SERENA:

Don’t Call Us Dead: Poems by Danez Smith at Read All the Things!

Award-winning poet Danez Smith is a groundbreaking force, celebrated for deft lyrics, urgent subjects, and performative power. Don’t Call Us Dead opens with a heartrending sequence that imagines an afterlife for black men shot by police, a place where suspicion, violence, and grief are forgotten and replaced with the safety, love, and longevity they deserved here on earth. Smith turns then to desire, mortality―the dangers experienced in skin and body and blood―and a diagnosis of HIV positive. “Some of us are killed / in pieces,” Smith writes, “some of us all at once.” Don’t Call Us Dead is an astonishing and ambitious collection, one that confronts, praises, and rebukes America―“Dear White America”―where every day is too often a funeral and not often enough a miracle.

“This book has been on my wish list for far too long…time to remedy that.”

The Book of Lost Names by Kristin Harmel at Silver’s Reviews.

Eva Traube Abrams, a semi-retired librarian in Florida, is shelving books one morning when her eyes lock on a photograph in a magazine lying open nearby. She freezes; it’s an image of a book she hasn’t seen in sixty-five years—a book she recognizes as The Book of Lost Names.

The accompanying article discusses the looting of libraries by the Nazis across Europe during World War II—an experience Eva remembers well—and the search to reunite people with the texts taken from them so long ago. The book in the photograph, an eighteenth-century religious text thought to have been taken from France in the waning days of the war, is one of the most fascinating cases. Now housed in Berlin’s Zentral- und Landesbibliothek library, it appears to contain some sort of code, but researchers don’t know where it came from—or what the code means. Only Eva holds the answer—but will she have the strength to revisit old memories and help reunite those lost during the war?

As a graduate student in 1942, Eva was forced to flee Paris after the arrest of her father, a Polish Jew. Finding refuge in a small mountain town in the Free Zone, she begins forging identity documents for Jewish children fleeing to neutral Switzerland. But erasing people comes with a price, and along with a mysterious, handsome forger named Rémy, Eva decides she must find a way to preserve the real names of the children who are too young to remember who they really are. The records they keep in The Book of Lost Names will become even more vital when the resistance cell they work for is betrayed and Rémy disappears.

“Yes, I know, I’m predictable. WWII related fiction again!”

What books caught your eyes this week?

Mailbox Monday

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Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

The end of June is busy with Father’s Day and my husband’s birthday back to back. I think we’ll just have his favorite ice cream cake and maybe some of his favorite foods — wings — and call it a party. I hope everyone is ready for a strange 4th of July. I’m considering a small gathering at social distance and a BBQ. We’ll see if that happens. Happy reading.

Share your new books below in Mr. Linky.

Enter your mailbox links below:

Don’t forget to check back for Books That Caught Our Eye at the end of the week, and share your picks.

Books That Caught Our Eye

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At Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Each week will share a few books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

MARTHA:
Serena picked I’m Still Here which was one of my choices too.

What the Moon Saw by D. L. Koontz found at Library of Clean Reads.
When newlywed FBI agent and brilliant linguist Libby Shaw is warned that her death is imminent, she’ll do anything she can to survive–even take mysterious advice to submerge in mineral water of Bedford Springs during a full moon. Libby finds herself thrust back in time to 1926, where danger and intrigue surround her. As Libby tries to adapt to her new life, she finds herself oddly drawn to the town sheriff who seems to know her far better than she knows herself. Yet he seems eerily familiar and as pieces of a past start surfacing in dreams and visions, Libby seeks out the handsome sheriff for answers, only to find more questions.

As Libby learns someone is following her to change history, she must join forces with the sheriff to uncover the mystery of their past. Will they be thwarted by the master criminal who’s determined to destroy them both or will they be able to build a life together after lifetimes of being pulled apart by nefarious forces?

“I liked the cover even before I discovered this is a time travel story. One of my fav genres.”

——–

This Book Is Anti-Racist: 20 Lessons on How to Wake Up, Take Action, and Do the Work by Tiffany Jewell, Aurelia Durand (Illustrations) found at My Lovely Secret.
Who are you?
What is your identity?
What is racism?
How do you choose your own path?
How do you stand in solidarity?
How can you hold yourself accountable?

Learn about identities, true histories, and anti-racism work in 20 carefully laid out chapters. Written by anti-bias, anti-racist, educator and activist, Tiffany Jewell, and illustrated by French illustrator Aurélia Durand in kaleidoscopic vibrancy.

This book is written for the young person who doesn’t know how to speak up to the racist adults in their life. For the 14 year old who sees injustice at school and isn’t able to understand the role racism plays in separating them from their friends. For the kid who spends years trying to fit into the dominant culture and loses themselves for a little while. It’s for all of the Black and Brown children who have been harmed (physically and emotionally) because no one stood up for them or they couldn’t stand up for themselves; because the colour of their skin, the texture of their hair, their names made white folx feel scared and threatened.

It is written so children and young adults will feel empowered to stand up to the adults who continue to close doors in their faces. This book will give them the language and ability to understand racism and a drive to undo it. In short, it is for everyone.

“I have been looking at the many books on antiracism and am interested in the thoughts of our participants who read them.”

——–

SERENA:

I’m Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness by Austin Channing Brown from vvb32 reads.

Austin Channing Brown’s first encounter with a racialized America came at age 7, when she discovered her parents named her Austin to deceive future employers into thinking she was a white man. Growing up in majority-white schools, organizations, and churches, Austin writes, “I had to learn what it means to love blackness,” a journey that led to a lifetime spent navigating America’s racial divide as a writer, speaker and expert who helps organizations practice genuine inclusion.

In a time when nearly all institutions (schools, churches, universities, businesses) claim to value “diversity” in their mission statements, I’m Still Here is a powerful account of how and why our actions so often fall short of our words. Austin writes in breathtaking detail about her journey to self-worth and the pitfalls that kill our attempts at racial justice, in stories that bear witness to the complexity of America’s social fabric–from Black Cleveland neighborhoods to private schools in the middle-class suburbs, from prison walls to the boardrooms at majority-white organizations.

“I don’t read a lot of memoirs, but these kinds of books are very important right now.”

The Boy Who Followed His Father Into Auschwitz by Jeremy Dronfield at Just Me Mrs. D.

Where there is family, there is hope

In 1939, Gustav Kleinmann, a Jewish upholster from Vienna, and his sixteen-year-old son Fritz are arrested by the Gestapo and sent to Germany. Imprisoned in the Buchenwald concentration camp, they miraculously survive the Nazis’ murderous brutality.

Then Gustav learns he is being sent to Auschwitz—and certain death.

For Fritz, letting his father go is unthinkable. Desperate to remain together, Fritz makes an incredible choice: he insists he must go too. To the Nazis, one death camp is the same as another, and so the boy is allowed to follow.

Throughout the six years of horror they witness and immeasurable suffering they endure as victims of the camps, one constant keeps them alive: their love and hope for the future.

Based on the secret diary that Gustav kept as well as meticulous archival research and interviews with members of the Kleinmann family, including Fritz’s younger brother Kurt, sent to the United States at age eleven to escape the war

“Yes, I love WWII novels, and this one seems very engaging. There were so many great choices this week.”

What books caught your eyes this week?