Books That Caught Our Eye

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dragonlegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Every Wednesday we will each share two books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.
 
 
 
LESLIE:

Shadow Child by Rahna Reiko Rizzuto at BermudaOnion.

Twin sisters Hana and Kei grew up in a tiny Hawaiian town in the 1950s and 1960s, so close they shared the same nickname. Raised in dreamlike isolation by their loving but unstable mother, they were fatherless, mixed-race, and utterly inseparable, devoted to one another. But when their cherished threesome with Mama is broken, and then further shattered by a violent, nearly fatal betrayal that neither young woman can forgive, it seems their bond may be severed forever–until, six years later, Kei arrives on Hana’s lonely Manhattan doorstep with a secret that will change everything.

Told in interwoven narratives that glide seamlessly between the gritty streets of New York, the lush and dangerous landscape of Hawaii, and the horrors of the Japanese internment camps and the bombing of Hiroshima, SHADOW CHILD is set against an epic sweep of history. Volcanos, tsunamis, abandonment, racism, and war form the urgent, unforgettable backdrop of this intimate, evocative, and deeply moving story of motherhood, sisterhood, and second chances.

MARTHA:

Who the Bishop Knows (The Amish Bishop Mysteries Book 3) by Vannetta Chapman found at An Imperfect Christian Mom.

What You Don’t See Might Hurt You

Every year, residents of the small Amish community in Monte Vista, Colorado, look forward to the Ski Hi Stampede, the state’s oldest professional rodeo. The rodeo is always good, clean entertainment for the hardworking farmers of the San Luis Valley. But this year, the Stampede turns deadly for one Amish man. Did rodeo fans see an unfortunate accident? Or something more sinister?

Amish bishop Henry Lapp is known far and wide for his uncanny ability to draw and remember the smallest details of anything he’s seen, skills that have served him well in past investigations. He was at the rodeo that day. The problem? He didn’t see Jeremiah Schwartz’s death.

With a murderer on the loose and members of his community being threatened, Henry must act fast. But can he solve a crime he didn’t see? This time around, Henry will have to rely on his keen sense of human character and observation, skills he’s honed in his role as bishop, if he hopes to crack the case.

Who the Bishop Knows is a story of accepting our talents, putting one another first, and trusting that God will care for His children.

I like the look and sound of this mystery.

——–

Side Life by Steve Toutonghi found Under My Apple Tree.

Dazzling, paranoid literary sci-fi for fans of Blake Crouch and Philip K. Dick

Vin, a down-on-his-luck young tech entrepreneur forced out of the software company he started, takes a job house-sitting an ultra-modern Seattle mansion whose owner has gone missing. There he discovers a secret basement lab with an array of computers and three large, smooth caskets. Inside one he finds a woman in a state of suspended animation. There is also a dog-eared notebook filled with circuit diagrams, beautiful and intricate drawings of body parts, and pages of code.

When Vin decides to climb into one of the caskets to see what happens, his reality begins to unravel, and he finds himself on a terrifying journey that asks fundamental questions about reality, free will, and the meaning of a human life.

Sci fi, software and caskets? Creepily interesting to me.

SERENA:

Best Beach Ever by Wendy Wax at Bookfan.

Forced to rent out or lose their beloved Bella Flora after the loss of their renovation-turned-reality-TV show Do Over, Maddie, Nikki, Avery, Kyra, and Bitsy move into cottages at the Sunshine Hotel and Beach Club believing the worst is over. Only to discover just how uncertain their futures really are.

Maddie struggles with the challenges of dating a rock star whose career has come roaring back to life while Nikki faces the daunting realities of mothering twins at forty-seven. Avery buries herself in a tiny home build in an attempt to dodge commitment issues, and Kyra battles to protect her son from the Hollywood world she once dreamed of joining. And Bitsy is about to find out whether the rewards of seeking revenge will outweigh the risks.

I just love Wendy Wax.

The Good Byline by Jill Orr at The Fiction Enthusiast.

Meet Riley Ellison, a quirky young library assistant who has become known in her hometown of Tuttle Corner, Virginia, as Riley Bless-Her-Heart. Riley’s odd habit of living vicariously through people she reads about in the obituary pages hits a little too close to home when she is asked to write one for her childhood best friend, Jordan James. Jordan’s unexpected suicide has left Riley desperate to understand why a young woman with so much to live for would suddenly opt out, so she steps out of her comfort zone and into the role of obituary writer.

Things get messy, however, when Jordan’s co-worker, a paranoid reporter with a penchant for conspiracy theories, convinces Riley that Jordan’s death was no suicide. He leads her down a dangerous path toward organized crime, secret lovers, and suspicious taco trucks. Eventually, Riley’s serpentine hunt for the truth leads to a discovery that puts everything she holds dear—her job, the people she loves, and even her life—in danger. Will writing this obituary be the death of her?

This sounds good.

What books caught your eye this week?

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Mailbox Monday

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mailboxes1Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week.

Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

It is hard to believe that in late March we had about 5 inches of snow here and spring was not as delightful as expected. March went by incredibly fast. I hope everyone received some wonderful new books. I’m just happy to be done with the taxes for the year.

In other good news, I was able to get the week off for my daughter’s spring break (which somehow survived the snow day rush). NO big plans, other than not having to work at home while she is there being her rambunctious self. I’m happy to able to do day trips with her and just enjoy her company. I need the relaxing downtime; work has been super busy and tiring.

Hope everyone had a good week. Tell us about your new books by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back later this week for Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

1 Comment

dragonlegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Every Wednesday we will each share two books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

LESLIE:

Amusing science cartoons about the natural world including animal dating profiles, wildlife wine pairings, threat displays of completely non-threatening animals, why hammerhead sharks have hammer heads, and much more.
Birding is My Favorite Video Game is a collection of fun, quasi-educational comics combining weird science, cute visuals, sweet wit, and a strong environmental message. Based on the popular webcomic Bird and Moon, this collection brings facts about birds, bees, and insects to life in the quirkiest, most wonderful way.
A bird book! What more is there to say? 🙂

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle at Carol’s Notebook.

It was a dark and stormy night; Meg Murry, her small brother Charles Wallace, and her mother had come down to the kitchen for a midnight snack when they were upset by the arrival of a most disturbing stranger.

“Wild nights are my glory,” the unearthly stranger told them. “I just got caught in a downdraft and blown off course. Let me sit down for a moment, and then I’ll be on my way. Speaking of ways, by the way, there is such a thing as a tesseract.”

A tesseract (in case the reader doesn’t know) is a wrinkle in time. To tell more would rob the reader of the enjoyment of Miss L’Engle’s unusual book. A Wrinkle in Time, winner of the Newbery Medal in 1963, is the story of the adventures in space and time of Meg, Charles Wallace, and Calvin O’Keefe (athlete, student, and one of the most popular boys in high school). They are in search of Meg’s father, a scientist who disappeared while engaged in secret work for the government on the tesseract problem.

A childhood favorite — and I just realized that I don’t own a copy of it!

MARTHA:

Orphan Monster Spy by Matt Killeen found at BermudaOnion’s Weblog.

Her name is Sarah. She’s blonde, blue-eyed, and Jewish in 1939 Germany. And her act of resistance is about to change the world.

After her mother is shot at a checkpoint, fifteen-year-old Sarah meets a mysterious man with an ambiguous accent, a suspiciously bare apartment, and a lockbox full of weapons. He’s part of the secret resistance against the Third Reich, and he needs Sarah to hide in plain sight at a school for the daughters of top Nazi brass, posing as one of them. If she can befriend the daughter of a key scientist and get invited to her house, she might be able to steal the blueprints to a bomb that could destroy the cities of Western Europe. Nothing could prepare Sarah for her cutthroat schoolmates, and soon she finds herself in a battle for survival unlike any she’d ever imagined. But anyone who underestimates this innocent-seeming girl does so at their peril. She may look sweet, but she’s the Nazis’ worst nightmare.

This title caught my eye and the blurb caught my attention.

Stardust by Neil Gaiman found at The Fiction Enthusiast.

In the tranquil fields and meadows of long-ago England, there is a small hamlet that has stood on a jut of granite for 600 years. Just to the east stands a high stone wall, for which the village is named. Here, in the hamlet of Wall, young Tristran Thorn has lost his heart to the hauntingly beautiful Victoria Forester. And here, one crisp October eve, Tristran makes his love a promise — an impetuous vow that will send him through the only breach in the wall, across the pasture… and into the most exhilarating adventure of his life.

I like Gaiman and this sounds good. Wasn’t this made into a movie?

SERENA:

Orphan Monster Spy by Matt Killeen found at BermudaOnion’s Weblog.

This was also on my list this week!

Just Add Sauce: A Revolutionary Guide to Boosting the Flavor of Everything You Cook at Under My Apple Tree.

Many home cooks find sauces to be intimidating, equating them with rarified French restaurant techniques. America’s Test Kitchen is knocking down that preconception with this ground-breaking cookbook that brings the flavorful world of sauces to life through the lens of home cooking. Sauce becomes the home cook’s secret weapon with more than 175 simple sauces accompanied by over 100 fresh and fun recipes that use them. You’ll be amazed at the versatility of the recipes in this uniquely organized and beautifully illustrated cookbook. In addition to the must-have classics that will boost your cooking arsenal (think: Warm Brown Butter-Hazelnut Vinaigrette with a Frisée Salad, a bright and bold Thyme-Sherry Vinegar Pan Sauce to dress up a Weeknight Roast Chicken, and a Teriyaki Stir-Fry Sauce for an at-home version of Chinese takeout), we also dive into the wide world of simmering sauces (from piquant Thai curries to complex Mexican moles), yogurt sauces (we take this familiar dairy product and give it new life), relishes (from classic Italian caponata to restaurant-inspired Grapefruit-Basil), herb sauces (Moroccan Chermoula to Argentinian Chimichurri to French Persillade), and more to open up new realms of flavor in your kitchen. You’ll find plenty of unexpected pairings that showcase the ways that sauces can improve your everyday cooking.

I’ve been doing some cooking so this fits in with my new recipes.

What books caught your eyes this week? Please share them in the comments.

Mailbox Monday

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mailboxes1Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week.

Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

Are we done with Nor’easters yet? Would you believe no? They’re tracking another one for the week it is supposed to be spring. Some have said the D.C. area may be the target. I’m sure that some people would be happy to finally see a lot of snow after all the cold, but that’s not me.

My daughter had a great birthday and now she’s telling all her friends that she is older and she has more knowledge. She cracks me up.

Hope everyone had a good week. Tell us about your new books by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back later this week for Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

3 Comments

dragonlegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Every Wednesday we will each share two books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

LESLIE:

Celtic Tales by Kate Forrester @The Fiction Enthusiast

The traditional stories of Ireland, Scotland, Brittany, and Wales transport us to the fantastical world of Celtic folklore. These timeless tales brim with wit and magic, and each on is brought to life with elegant silhouette art in this special illustrated edition.

I find folklore fascinating. This sounds delightful.

After the Fire by Henning Mankell at Book Dilettante.

Fredrik Welin is a seventy-year-old retired doctor. Years ago he retreated to the Swedish archipelago, where he lives alone on an island. He swims in the sea every day, cutting a hole in the ice if necessary. He lives a quiet life. Until he wakes up one night to find his house on fire.

Fredrik escapes just in time, wearing two left-footed wellies, as neighbouring islanders arrive to help douse the flames. All that remains in the morning is a stinking ruin and evidence of arson. The house that has been in his family for generations and all his worldly belongings are gone. He cannot think who would do such a thing, or why. Without a suspect, the police begin to think he started the fire himself.

Tackling love, loss and loneliness, After the Fire is Henning Mankell’s compelling last novel.

I always enjoy a good mystery.

MARTHA:

Island Games: Mystery of the Four Quadrants by Caleb J. Boyer found at Library of Clean Reads.

When two boys wake up on a mysterious island, survival becomes more than a game…

Matthew and Ryan have no idea where they are. After waking up on a sandy beach with no clue how they got there, they realize they have no supplies, no shelter, and no way of escaping the creepy island. Their only chance of surviving the terrors of the night requires counting on each other…

As Matthew and Ryan explore their new surroundings, they discover there’s more to the island than meets the eye. The boys must face off against a series of challenges that test their strength, their smarts, and their friendship…

When the pressure to make it through each obstacle threatens to tear them apart, Matthew and Ryan must fight to keep their friendship and their lives…

Island Games is the first book in a series of fast-pced Young Adult adventures. If you like shocking twists, edge-of-your-seat action, and stories of true friendship, then you’ll love Caleb J. Boyer’s tropical tale.

Seeing a book written by a 12 year old sure caught my eye. I like the book premise.

The Girl Who Smiled Beads: A Story of War and What Comes After by Clemantine Wamariya and Elizabeth Weil found at BermudaOnion’s Weblog.

“The plot provided by the universe was filled with starvation, war and rape. I would not–could not–live in that tale.”

Clemantine Wamariya was six years old when her mother and father began to speak in whispers, when neighbors began to disappear, and when she heard the loud, ugly sounds her brother said were thunder. In 1994, she and her fifteen-year-old sister, Claire, fled the Rwandan massacre and spent the next six years migrating through seven African countries, searching for safety–perpetually hungry, imprisoned and abused, enduring and escaping refugee camps, finding unexpected kindness, witnessing inhuman cruelty. They did not know whether their parents were dead or alive.

When Clemantine was twelve, she and her sister were granted refugee status in the United States; there, in Chicago, their lives diverged. Though their bond remained unbreakable, Claire, who had for so long protected and provided for Clemantine, was a single mother struggling to make ends meet, while Clemantine was taken in by a family who raised her as their own. She seemed to live the American dream: attending private school, taking up cheerleading, and, ultimately, graduating from Yale. Yet the years of being treated as less than human, of going hungry and seeing death, could not be erased. She felt at the same time six years old and one hundred years old.

In The Girl Who Smiled Beads, Clemantine provokes us to look beyond the label of “victim” and recognize the power of the imagination to transcend even the most profound injuries and aftershocks. Devastating yet beautiful, and bracingly original, it is a powerful testament to her commitment to constructing a life on her own terms.

This just grabbed my heartstrings

SERENA:

Celtic Tales by Kate Forrester @The Fiction Enthusiast

The traditional stories of Ireland, Scotland, Brittany, and Wales transport us to the fantastical world of Celtic folklore. These timeless tales brim with wit and magic, and each on is brought to life with elegant silhouette art in this special illustrated edition.

I am fascinated by Irish stories and myths, so this sounds delightful, especially since it’s illustrated.

Book Towns by Alex Johnson @Library of Clean Reads

Around 40 semi-official Book Towns now exist around the world, with most concentrated in Europe, South-East Asia, North America and Australia, but until now, there has been no directory of their location, history and charm. Book Towns takes readers on a richly illustrated tour of these captivating literary towns, outlining the history and development of each community, as well as offering practical travel advice.

Many Book Towns have emerged in areas of marked attraction, such as Ureña in Spain or Fjaerland in Norway, where bookshops have been set up in buildings including former ferry waiting rooms and banks. The views of the nearby glacier and dramatic mountains are superb. Although the UK has the best known examples at Hay, Wigtown and Sedbergh, the book has a broad international appeal, featuring locations such as Jimbochu in Japan, College Street in Calcutta, and major unofficial ‘book cities’ such as Buenos Aires.

I love traveling and bookstores, I would love to see these book towns, even if it is just in a book.

What books caught your eye this week?

Mailbox Monday

5 Comments

mailboxes1Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

We’re looking ahead to a third nor’easter this weekend. Not sure if we’ll be getting the snow or just the wind this time, but I’m sure snow will hit somewhere. My daughter had her birthday bash on Saturday, and it’s always fun to watch her have fun with her friends and bounce around. I hope everyone had a great week.

Hope everyone had a good week. Tell us about your new books by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back later this week for Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

2 Comments

DragonLegendsAt Mailbox Monday we encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

Every Wednesday we will each share two books that caught our eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Martha is enjoying her cruise, so it will just be Leslie and I sharing our picks this week:

LESLIE:

Digging In by Loretta Nyhan at The Fiction Enthusiast.

Paige Moresco found her true love in eighth grade—and lost him two years ago. Since his death, she’s been sleepwalking through life, barely holding on for the sake of her teenage son. Her house is a wreck, the grass is overrun with weeds, and she’s at risk of losing her job. As Paige stares at her neglected lawn, she knows she’s hit rock bottom. So she does something entirely unexpected: she begins to dig.

As the hole gets bigger, Paige decides to turn her entire yard into a vegetable garden. The neighbors in her tidy gated community are more than a little alarmed. Paige knows nothing about gardening, and she’s boldly flouting neighborhood-association bylaws. But with the help of new friends, a charming local cop, and the transformative power of the soil, Paige starts to see potential in the chaos of her life. Something big is beginning to take root—both in her garden and in herself.

“Gardening is my therapy; this sounds good!”

I Dissent: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark by Debbie Levy at Savvy Verse and Wit.

Get to know celebrated Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg—in the first picture book about her life—as she proves that disagreeing does not make you disagreeable!

Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has spent a lifetime disagreeing: disagreeing with inequality, arguing against unfair treatment, and standing up for what’s right for people everywhere. This biographical picture book about the Notorious RBG, tells the justice’s story through the lens of her many famous dissents, or disagreements.

“A good choice for young readers — and I’d like to read it too!”

SERENA:

Sold on a Monday by Kristina McMorris @Book Dillettante

2 CHILDREN FOR SALE

The scrawled sign, peddling young siblings on a farmhouse porch, captures the desperation sweeping the country in 1931. It’s an era of breadlines, bank runs, and impossible choices.

Two people who discover this story today set out to right a wrongdoing and mend a fractured family, at the risk of everything they value.

I’ve read McMorris’ work before and enjoyed it. This sounds like another winner.

If You Come Softly by Jacqueline Woodson @BermudaOnion’s Blog

Jeremiah feels good inside his own skin. That is, when he’s in his own Brooklyn neighborhood. But now he’s going to be attending a fancy prep school in Manhattan, and black teenage boys don’t exactly fit in there. So it’s a surprise when he meets Ellie the first week of school. In one frozen moment their eyes lock, and after that they know they fit together–even though she’s Jewish and he’s black. Their worlds are so different, but to them that’s not what matters. Too bad the rest of the world has to get in their way.

I’ve enjoyed other books by Woodson.

Let us know what books caught your eyes this week.