Mailbox Monday

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Sunflower MailboxMailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

It’s already the last Monday in November. Wow! That went by fast.

Here in the US we will be celebrating our Thanksgiving Day holiday on Thursday, followed by the insanity of Black Friday shopping a few hours later. I abhor crowds and will be shopping from my computer and working at home. But for those of you who venture out, good luck on those deals! And stay safe out there.

Hopefully everyone had some nice goodies in their mailbox last week. And if not, I’m sure we all have lots of books from previous weeks to catch up with!

Join in by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back here on Wednesday when I will post a selection of Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

8 Comments

Books That Caught Our Eye

Here at Mailbox Monday, we want to encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received. We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Here are the books that caught our eye this week:

Serena

revivalStephen King’s Revival from Beauty in Ruins.

Honestly, there’s nothing better than a good Stephen King book, and this one has been much anticipated.

“In a small New England town, over half a century ago, a shadow falls over a small boy playing with his toy soldiers. Jamie Morton looks up to see a striking man, the new minister. Charles Jacobs, along with his beautiful wife, will transform the local church. The men and boys are all a bit in love with Mrs. Jacobs; the women and girls feel the same about Reverend Jacobs — including Jamie’s mother and beloved sister, Claire. With Jamie, the Reverend shares a deeper bond based on a secret obsession. When tragedy strikes the Jacobs family, this charismatic preacher curses God, mocks all religious belief, and is banished from the shocked town.”

bookswenttowarWhen Books Went to War by Molly Guptill Manning from Under My Apple Tree.

I was just reading in Jane Austen Cover to Cover that Austen’s books were given to soldiers as a way to calm them from the symptoms of shell shock after WWI, so I think this book will be fascinating.

“In 1943, the War Department and the publishing industry stepped in with an extraordinary program: 120 million small, lightweight paperbacks, for troops to carry in their pockets and their rucksacks, in every theater of war.”

Vicki

DrivingTheKingDriving the King by Ravi Howard @ Bermudaonion.

“The war is over, the soldiers are returning, and Nat King Cole is back in his hometown of Montgomery, Alabama, for a rare performance. His childhood friend, Nat Weary, plans to propose to his sweetheart, and the singer will honor their moment with a special song. But while the world has changed, segregated Jim Crow Montgomery remains the same. When a white man attacks Cole with a pipe, Weary leaps from the audience to defend him—an act that will lead to a 10-year prison sentence.

But the singer will not forget his friend and the sacrifice he. Six months before Weary is released, he receives a remarkable offer: will he be Nat King Cole’s driver and bodyguard in L.A.. It is the promise of a new life removed from the terror, violence, and degradation of Jim Crow Alabama.”

As a fan of Nat King Cole, this book intriques me.

Murder at the Book Group by Maggie King @ Bermudaonion.

MurderBookGroup“For fans of Anne Canadeo comes a fun and sassy cozy mystery in which one woman must solve the murder of a book group member and untangle a web of secrets hidden by her bookish cohorts.

Hazel Rose never dreamed that the murder mystery book group she and her friend Carlene started would stage a “real “murder.
Nevertheless, on the night when the normally composed Carlene seems unusually angry and rattled, during group discussion she dies after drinking cyanide-spiked tea. Despite a suicide note, Hazel is skeptical; Carlene never seemed suicidal–why else would she make all those plans for her future? Incidentally, Carlene was married to Hazel’s ex-husband, and Hazel has always suspected there might be something more to her past than she let on.

How much does anyone really know about Carlene Arness? And did she die by her own hand or someone else’s? Hazel begins a search for the truth that produces no shortage of motives, as she unearths a past that Carlene took great pains to hide. And most of those motives belong to the members of her very own book group…

Featuring memorable characters and a wicked sense of humor, “Murder at the Book Group” shows the darker side of a book club where reading isn’t about pleasure–it’s about payback.”

I’ve been wanting to read more cozies and this is about a book group. It sounds really good.

Leslie

Only one for me this week. My second pick was Murder at the Book Group, already highlighted by Vicki. And really, what booklover can resist a cozy mystery about a bookclub murder?

The Great Zoo of China by Matthew Reilly at Booklover Book Reviews.

GreatZoo“It is a secret the Chinese government has been keeping for forty years. They have found a species of animal no one believed even existed. It will amaze the world. Now the Chinese are ready to unveil their astonishing discovery within the greatest zoo ever constructed. A small group of VIPs and journalists has been brought to the zoo deep within China to see its fabulous creatures for the first time. Among them is Dr. Cassandra Jane ‘CJ’ Cameron, a writer for National Geographic and an expert on reptiles. The visitors are assured by their Chinese hosts that they will be struck with wonder at these beasts, that they are perfectly safe, and that nothing can go wrong. Of course it can’t…”

Speculative fiction is a favorite genre of mine. Plus this one has a Jurassic Park feel to it, a book I enjoyed.

Mailbox Monday

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SnowyMailboxesMailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

Another week, another Monday!

We’re halfway through November already. Soon it will be snowing and the holidays will be here. Oh, wait, it’s snowing as I’m typing this. Yes, really, it is!

Hopefully everyone had some nice goodies in their mailbox last week. And if not, I’m sure we all have lots of books from previous weeks to catch up on!

Join in by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back here on Wednesday when I will post a selection of Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

5 Comments

Books That Caught Our Eye

Here at Mailbox Monday, we want to encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received. We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Here are the books that caught our eye this week:

Serena

AgainstTheTideAgainst the Tide by Elizabeth Camden from Luxury Reading.

Set in Boston, that’s all I need, but there is also a woman with translation skills and she helps out the U.S. Navy.

“As a child, Lydia Pallas became all too familiar with uncertainty when it came to the future. Now, she’s finally carved out a perfect life for herself–a life of stability and order with no changes, surprises, or chaos of any kind. She adores her apartment overlooking the bustling Boston Harbor, and her skill with languages has landed her a secure position as a translator for the U.S. Navy.

However, it is her talent for translation that brings her into contact with Alexander Banebridge, or “Bane,” a man who equally attracts and aggravates her. When Bane hires Lydia to translate a seemingly innocuous collection of European documents, she hesitantly agrees, only to discover she is in over her head.”

Prince_LestatPrince Lestat by Anne Rice from Beauty in Ruins and Under My Apple Tree.

My guilty pleasure used to be the Vampire Chronicles by Anne Rice. Lestat was my favorite of all the vampires next to Marius. I cannot wait to read this.

“The novel opens with the vampire world in crisis…vampires have been proliferating out of control; burnings have commenced all over the world, huge massacres similar to those carried out by Akasha in The Queen of the Damned… Old vampires, roused from slumber in the earth are doing the bidding of a Voice commanding that they indiscriminately burn vampire-mavericks in cities from Paris and Mumbai to Hong Kong, Kyoto, and San Francisco”

Vicki

BeachStreetBakeryLittle Beach Street Bakery by Jenny Colgan @ Lori’s Reading Corner.

Amid the ruins of her latest relationship, Polly Waterford moves far away to the sleepy seaside resort of Polbearne, where she lives in a small, lonely flat above an abandoned shop.

To distract her from her troubles, Polly throws herself into her favorite hobby: making bread. But her relaxing weekend diversion quickly develops into a passion. As she pours her emotions into kneading and pounding the dough, each loaf becomes better than the last. Soon, Polly is working her magic with nuts and seeds, olives and chorizo, and the local honey-courtesy of a handsome local beekeeper. Drawing on reserves of determination and creativity Polly never knew she had, she bakes and bakes . . . and discovers a bright new life where she least expected it.
TwilightHour

The Twilight Hour by Nicci Gerrard @ Serendipity.

Eleanor Lee has lived a fiercely independent existence for over ninety years, but now it’s time to tidy her life away – books, photographs, paintings, letters – a lifetime of possessions all neatly boxed up for the last time. But amongst them there are some things that must be kept hidden. And, nearing blindness, Eleanor needs help to uncover them before her children and grandchildren do.

Leslie

RobotScientistThe Robot Scientist’s Daughter by Jeannine Hall Gailey at Savvy Verse & Wit.

Dazzling in its descriptions of a natural world imperiled by the hidden dangers of our nuclear past, this book presents a girl in search of the secrets of survival. In The Robot Scientist’s Daughter, Jeannine Hall Gailey creates for us a world of radioactive wasps, cesium in the sunflowers, and robotic daughters. She conjures the intricate menace of the nuclear family and nuclear history, juxtaposing surreal cyborgs, mad scientists from fifties horror flicks and languid scenes of rural childhood. Mining her experience growing up in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the writer allows the stories of the creation of the first atomic bomb, the unintended consequences of scientific discovery, and building nests for birds in the crooks of maple trees to weave together a reality at once terrifying and beautiful.

Definitely a book for me!

MrSamuelMr. Samuel’s Penny by Treva Hall Melvin at I’d Rather Be At The Beach.

It’s 1972 and fourteen-year-old New Yorker Elizabeth Landers is sent to the sleepy town of Ahoskie, North Carolina to spend the summer with relatives. Her expectation of boredom is quickly dispelled when police sirens and flashing lights draw her to a horrible scene at the Danbury Bridge. Mr. Samuel, owner of Samuel’s Lumber Yard, has driven his car off the bridge and into the river, drowning himself and his daughter. The medical examiner thinks it’s an accident, but the Sheriff finds fresh bullet holes on the bridge right where the skid marks are.

I’m always looking for a good mystery to read. For some, 1972 is historical fiction – for me it’s reminiscing about the past.

Mailbox Monday

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Sunflower MailboxMailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

Another week, another Monday!

Hopefully everyone had some nice goodies in their mailbox last week. And if not, I’m sure we all have lots of books from previous weeks to catch up on!

Join in by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

Be sure to stop back here on Wednesday when I will post a selection of Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

12 Comments

Books That Caught Our Eye

Here at Mailbox Monday, we want to encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received. We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Here are the books that caught our eye this week:

Serena

Emma by Alexander McCall Smith at Sam Still Reading.
Emma

The summer after she graduates from university, Emma Woodhouse returns home to the village of Highbury, where she will live with her health-conscious father until she is ready to launch her interior-design business and strike out on her own. In the meantime, she will do what she does best: offer guidance to those less wise than she is in the ways of the world. Happily, this summer brings many new faces to Highbury and into the sphere of Emma’s not always perfectly felicitous council: Harriet Smith, a naïve teacher’s assistant at the ESL school run by the hippie-ish Mrs. Goddard; Frank Churchill, the attractive stepson of Emma’s former governess; and, of course, the perfect Jane Fairfax.

I love Jane Austen, and this is part of the Austen project in which authors place their own spin on those tales of English society. I think given Smith’s name recognition and his skill as a writer, this will be a good rendition. I cannot wait to get my hands on it.

Flunked by Jen Calonita at Library of Clean Reads.

Flunked

Full of regret, Cinderella’s wicked stepmother, Flora, has founded the Fairy Tale Reform School with the mission of turning the wicked and criminally mischievous into upstanding members of Enchantasia.

Impish, sassy 12-year-old Gilly has a history of petty theft and she’s not too sorry about it. When she lifts a hair clip, she gets tossed in reform school-for at least three months. But when she meets fellow students Jax and Kayla, she learns there’s more to this school than its sweet mission. There’s a battle brewing and she starts to wonder: can a villian really change?

My daughter has rekindled my interest in fairy tales, and this is part of a series of twisted fairy tales, which are usually fun reads.

Vicki

Singing to a Bulldog by Anson Williams @ Bookfan.
Bulldog

Growing up in 1950s California, young Anson William Heimlich showed very little promise. Clumsy, unsure of himself, and made to feel like a failure by his disappointed artist of a dad, Anson started working odd jobs as a teenager to help support his family. His boss at one of these jobs, an aging African-American janitor named Willie, unexpectedly became a mentor—and the lessons he taught young Anson proved to be invaluable throughout his subsequent career as an actor, director, and entrepreneur.

In Singing to a Bulldog, Anson Williams (as he came to be known) relates both these lessons and the never-before-revealed stories of the many seminal TV series he has worked on and the famous (and not-so-famous) folks he’s encountered during his 40 years in Hollywood, including: • being directed by Steven Spielberg in his first dramatic role • getting kidnapped by Gerald Ford’s daughter at the White House • subbing for Sammy Davis, Jr., as a headliner with Bill Cosby • being humbled by Sunny, a young volunteer for the Cerebral Palsy National Organization • mentoring Shailene Woodley on the set of The Secret Life of the American Teenager and many more.

This compelling read has a cross-generational and broad appeal, combining all the fun of a celebrity memoir with the emotional impact of an inspirational bestseller. With Singing to a Bulldog, Anson Williams brings his gift of storytelling to a new medium in a book that is sure to touch readers’ hearts and lives as profoundly as Willie once touched his.

I LOVED him on Happy Day!! I can’t wait to read this!!

Texts from Jane Eyre: And Other Conversations with Your Favorite Literary Characters by Mallory Ortberg @ Bookfan.

JaneEyre

Hilariously imagined text conversations—the passive aggressive, the clever, and the strange—from classic and modern literary figures, from Scarlett O’Hara to Jessica Wakefield

Mallory Ortberg, the co-creator of the cult-favorite website The Toast, presents this whimsical collection of hysterical text conversations from your favorite literary characters. Everyone knows that if Scarlett O’Hara had an unlimited text-and-data plan, she’d constantly try to tempt Ashley away from Melanie with suggestive messages. If Mr. Rochester could text Jane Eyre, his ardent missives would obviously be in all-caps. And Daisy Buchanan would not only text while driving, she’d text you to pick her up after she totaled her car. Based on the popular web-feature, Texts from Jane Eyre is a witty, irreverent mashup that brings the characters from your favorite books into the twenty-first century.

It’s about favorite literary characters and supposed to be hilarious. Sounds like my kind of book!

Leslie

One Step Too Far by Tina Seskis at Book Dilettante.
StepTooFar

A happy marriage. A beautiful family. A lovely home. So what makes Emily Coleman get up one morning and walk right out of her life–to start again as someone new?

Now, Emily has become Cat, working at a hip advertising agency in London and living on the edge with her inseparable new friend, Angel. Cat’s buried any trace of her old self so well, no one knows how to find her. But she can’t bury the past–or her own memories.

And soon, she’ll have to face the truth of what she’s done–a shocking revelation that may push her one step too far.

I love a good psychological thriller.

My Real Children by Jo Walton at Sam Still Reading.

MyRealChildren

An alternate history, in which a woman with dementia struggles to remember her two contradictory lives.

It is 2015 and Patricia Cowan is very old. ‘Confused today’ read the notes clipped to the end of her bed. Her childhood, her years at Oxford during the Second World War – those things are solid in her memory. Then that phone call and… her memory splits in two.

She was Trish, a housewife and mother of four. She was Pat, a successful travel writer and mother of three.

She remembers living her life as both women, so very clearly. Which memory is real – or are both just tricks of time and light?

This sounds a little like Life After Life, a book I both enjoyed and was disappointed in. But I do enjoy speculative fiction so this is worth an addition to my to-read list.

Mailbox Monday

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Sunflower MailboxMailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

It’s the first week of November and that means Mailbox Monday’s hosting duties have rotated. I will be posting the Monday linky and Wednesday’s selections for Books That Caught Our Eye for the rest of the month.

Where has the time gone? The year has flown by so quickly! It seems like it was only days ago when those now long-gone sunflowers were blooming in my garden. The brilliant colors of autumn are still lingering here in the North, but the days are shortening and winter is on the horizon. I’m jealous of the arriving spring for those in the southern part of the world.

Hopefully everyone found some nice goodies in their mailbox last week. Let us know what you received by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below: