Books That Caught Our Eye

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Books That Caught Our Eye

Here at Mailbox Monday, we want to encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received. We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Here are the books that caught our eye this week:

Serena

Day After Night by Anita Diamant @ Diary of an Eccentric.

DayAfterNightThis is based on a true rescue of illegal immigrants from the Atlit internment camp run by the British military on the Mediterranean coast south of Haifa. This is about those who survived the Holocaust. There aren’t too many after the war that focus on what happened to displaced persons, so this intrigues me. After the joy and elation of being saved from the atrocities perpetrated by the Nazis where do you go when everything you’ve ever known and everyone you’ve ever know have been destroyed?

The Mapmaker’s Children by Sarah McCoy @ Musings From Sri Lanka.

I loved Sarah McCoy’s The Baker’s Daughter and The Time It Snowed in Puerto Rico! I knew she was working on another novel, even after reading her story in Grand Central this year, and I am eager to get my hands on it as you can imagine. I haven’t found a lot of good books about the Civil War, and this one is about the Underground Railroad and more. I know in McCoy’s hands, this is going to be a winner.

Vicki

TheRoomThe Room by Jonas Karlsson @ Booklover Book Reviews.

Bjorn is a co mpulsive, exacting bureaucrat who discovers a secret room at the government office where he works-a secret room that no one else in his office will acknowledge.

I want to find out what happens to Bjorn and if the room really does exist, and if it does, why is everyone else acting like it doesn’t.

AllGoodWomenAll Good Women by Valerie Miner @ Musings From Sri Lanka.

As World War II rages abroad, a group of women forge the bonds of sisterhood in America. Against the backdrop of a nation gripped by fear and paranoia, Miner eloquently captures the spirit of wartime on the home front

I love books about women who are strong. I love that these women are trying to live as normal a life as possible, in a time of such turmoil.

Leslie

The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan at Savvy Verse and Wit.

OmnivoreThe question of what to have for dinner has confronted us since man discovered fire. But as Michael Pollan explains in this revolutionary book, how we answer it now, as the dawn of the twenty-first century, may determine our survival as a species. Packed with profound surprises, The Omnivore’s Dilemma is changing the way Americans thing about the politics, perils, and pleasures of eating.

I know this isn’t new book, but I’m reminded again that it is one that I want to read.

LastBreathThe Last Breath by Kimberly Belle at Melissa’s Eclectic Bookshelf.

From a remarkable new voice in suspenseful women’s fiction comes an emotionally searing drama about a woman who risks her life to discover the devastating truth about her family.

Suspense and family secrets. Sounds good to me.

Mailbox Monday

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Sunflower MailboxMailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

Summer is winding down for us in the Northern Hemisphere and many schools are back in session this week. I’m already feeling a sense of autumn in the air with our mild days and cool nights. But summer hasn’t left us yet – I’ll be posting MM for two more weeks before we head into September.

Hopefully everyone found some nice goodies in their mailbox last week. Let us know what you received by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky:

Be sure to stop back on Wednesday when I will be posting Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

4 Comments

Books That Caught Our Eye

Here at Mailbox Monday, we want to encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received. We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Here are the books that caught our eye this week:

Serena

HorrorstorHorrorstör by Grady Hendrix from Quirk Books @ Under My Apple Tree.

First off, this cover reminds me of those IKEA catalogs I covet. I love getting new ideas on how to get the most out of our furniture in terms of design and storage. Regardless of that, Quirk Books always puts out books that are humorous in ways that I appreciate. This one is a haunted house story in a contemporary setting, in which workers are determined to find out what is happen in their furniture store overnight!

VampiresVampires of Manhattan by Melissa de la Cruz. This is a New Adult continuation of the Blue Bloods series. The audio is performed by MacLeod Andrews. From The Reading Date.

I loved the Blue Bloods series (Ok, I haven’t had time to read them all). But I want to see what happens when they grow up. Oliver Hazard-Perry is one of my favorites from the series, and it looks like he’s a big player in this new series. I love that it’s branching out in to an adult series.

Vicki

LostGirlsThe Lost Girls: Three Friends. Four Continents. One Unconventional Detour Around the World by Jennifer Baggett, Holly C. Corbett, Amanda Pressner @ Infinite Curio

Three friends leave everything to go on a trip around the world. Freinds and travel, two of my favorite things!!
 
 
StormSurgeStorm Surge: Hurricane Sandy, Our Warming Planet, and the Extreme Weather of the Future by Adam Sobel @ Book Dilettante.

Living in Florida, I’ve lived through some pretty awful hurricane’s, so of course this book interests me. I can’t wait to read what the author has to say.

Leslie

GardenOfLettersThe Garden of Letters by Alyson Richman. I saw this one at several blogs: Savvy Verse and Wit, Posting for Now and Diary of an Eccentric.

Coastal Villages in Italy always attract my attention. Although the beautiful cover did play a part in catching my eye.

Set against the rich backdrop of World War II Italy, Garden of Letters captures the hope, suspense, and romance of an uncertain era, in an epic intertwining story of first love, great tragedy, and spectacular bravery.

ManNatureMan V. Nature: Stories by Diane Cook at Bibliophile by the Sea and Luxury Reading.

Told with perfect rhythm and unyielding brutality, these stories expose unsuspecting men and women to the realities of nature, the primal instincts of man, and the dark humor and heartbreak of our struggle to not only thrive, but survive.

The title got my attention. I like short stories and these sound more than a little unusual.

Mailbox Monday

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Sunflower MailboxMailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

Second week of August already. Time seems to be flying by. Hopefully everyone found some nice goodies in their mailbox last week. Let us know what you received by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky:

Be sure to stop back on Wednesday when I will be posting Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

5 Comments

Books That Caught Our Eye

Here at Mailbox Monday, we want to encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received. We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Here are the books that caught our eye this week:

Serena

PicassoMadame Picasso by Anne Girard @ The Reading Date.

I love artists and their lives, what inspires them, etc. This is the novel of Eva Gouel, the first great love of Pablo Picasso’s life and it’s set in Paris. I cannot wait to read this one. I’ve always loved his work, though some of his work is a bit odd.

NoraWebsterNora Webster: A Novel by Colm Tóibín @ Kimberly’s Bookshelf.

I love reading stories about the Irish, particularly those in Ireland — since that’s one country on my bucket list. Nora Webster is a widower at age 40 and she has children to care for, but when you lose the love of your life, it can be hard to pick yourself up and keep moving. I cannot wait to read this heart-breaker.

Vicki

4thJulyCreekFourth of July Creek by Smith Henderson @ Fiction Books.

After trying to help Benjamin Pearl, an undernourished, nearly feral eleven-year-old boy living in the Montana wilderness, social worker Pete Snow comes face to face with the boy’s profoundly disturbed father, Jeremiah. With courage and caution, Pete slowly earns a measure of trust from this paranoid survivalist itching for a final conflict that will signal the coming End Times.

But as Pete’s own family spins out of control, Pearl’s activities spark the full-blown interest of the F.B.I., putting Pete at the center of a massive manhunt from which no one will emerge unscathed.

This book grabbed my attention when I read the first part of the first sentence. Everything after that just cemented my choice.

ChickenChicken: A Fresh Take on Classic Recipes by Marcus Bean @ Under My Apple Tree

An opening section of the book gives guidelines for purchasing, storing, and preparing your whole chicken or chicken parts. Next up are weekday meals, followed by chapter “for the weekend” and concluding with dinners & celebrations. The more than 100 brand-new recipes include mouthwatering takes chicken salad: Chicken Waldorf salad with crispy shallots; Chargrilled chicken, fennel & feta salad; glazed orange and mustard chicken with chard & spinach salad; and Quinoa Chicken and asparagus salad. Then there’s the Chicken spring rolls with hoisin sauce; chicken fajitas & homemade smoked paprika wraps; Mango & coriander coronation chicken pitta pockets. And even though he’s British, he doesn’t leave out soul food favorites like Southern Fried Chicken and Chili Corn or the New Orleans classic: Chicken, chorizo & tiger prawn paella.

I love me some chicken, I’d rather have it than any other meat, so there’s no way this book didn’t make one of my picks this week!

Leslie

BrightwellMurder at the Brightwell by Ashley Weaver @ Bermudaonion.

A delicious novel in which murder invades polite society and romance springs in unexpected places. Ashley Weaver’s debut is a wonderful testament to the enduring delight of the traditional mystery.

An attractive cover will always get my attention, plus this sounds like a good old fashioned Agatha Christie-ish murder mystery.

Sparrow

Flight of the Sparrow: A Novel of Early America by Amy Belding Brown @ Silver’s Reviews.

Based on the compelling true narrative of Mary Rowlandson, Flight of the Sparrow is an evocative tale that transports the reader to a little-known time in early America and explores the real meanings of freedom, faith, and acceptance.

She suspects that she has changed too much to ever fit easily into English society again. The wilderness has now become her home. She can interpret the cries of birds. She has seen vistas that have stolen away her breath. She has learned to live in a new, free way….

Historical fiction, wilderness, nature, and an eye-catching cover. Sounds like a book I would enjoy.

Mailbox Monday

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Sunflower MailboxMailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

Is it August already? It sure is, and that means Mailbox Monday’s hosting duties have rotated. I will be posting the Monday linky and Wednesday’s selections for Books That Caught Our Eye for the next few weeks.

Hopefully everyone found some nice goodies in their mailbox last week. Let us know what you received by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky below:

The Mailbox Monday Logo. Feel free to use the new logo on your posts if you like. This is my actual home mailbox. A rouge sunflower grew in front of it, and this is how it looked for a few weeks in July. I couldn’t resist!

Books That Caught Our Eye

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Here at Mailbox Monday, we want to encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

To that end, we’ve decided to share “Books that Caught Our Eye” with you. Each week, LeslieSerena and Vicki  will each share 2 books that caught their eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday and share them here.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Here are the books that caught our eye this week:

 

Leslie
20821614You by Caroline Kepnes at Sam Still Reading.
A chilling account of unrelenting passion, Caroline Kepnes’s You is a perversely romantic thriller that’s more dangerously clever than any you’ve read before.

I’m not a big ‘romance’ reader but if a romance is wrapped in another genre, I’ll enjoy it just the same. A lot of good reviews on this one with comments like ‘unusual’ and ‘strange’, which made me even more curious to read it.

 

Don’t Try to Find Me by Holly Brown at The Infinite Curio 18698861
When a 14-year-old runs away, her parents turn to social media to find her-launching a public campaign that will expose their darkest secrets and change their family forever.

I usually like these types of thrillers – this sounds a bit like Reconstructing Amelia, which I enjoyed. The reviews have been mixed but I’d give it a chance anyway.

 

 

Serena
20624082Luna Tango by Alli Sinclair @ Sam Still Reading

Journalist Dani McKenna enters the world of tango in order to uncover lies that have threatened three generations of her family as she seeks to understand why her mother abandoned her, why her grandmother lives in fear, and more. She meets a revered tango dancer named Carlos — and you know that passions will flare!

What secrets could be that powerful? Inquiring minds want to know.

 

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by
Benjamin Alire Sáenz @Infinite Curio 12000020

What first struck me about this book was the swirly type on the cover, the images, and the field with the red truck which seems out of place when talking about Aristotle and Dante, so I had to find out more about this book.

Looking at the synopsis, you know that the characters are not who you think they are but two boys in a coming of age novel. Aristotle is angry and has a brother in prison, while Dante is a little bit of an outsider and has a unique way of looking at the world. At first glance these boys would seem to have nothing in common, but once they get to know each other, things change. Seems like a good coming of age novel to me!

 

Vicki
616ErwQ9aHLThe Blue Fox by Sjón @ Bermudaonion
Set against the stark backdrop of the Icelandic winter, an elusive, enigmatic fox leads a hunter on a transformative quest. At the edge of the hunter’s territory, a naturalist struggles to build a life for his charge, a young woman with Down syndrome whom he had rescued from a shipwreck years before. By the end of Sjón’s slender, spellbinding fable of a novel, none of their lives will be the same.

Sounds interesting and different than my usual reads.

 

Enchanted Objects: Design, Human Desire, and the Internet of Things  by David Rose @ Under My Apple Tree18143776
Soon, connected technology will be embedded in hundreds of everyday objects we already use: our cars, wallets, watches, umbrellas, even our trash cans. These objects will respond to our needs, come to know us, and learn to think on our behalf. David Rose calls these devices—which are just beginning to creep into the marketplace—Enchanted Objects.

I’d love to see what advancements the author thinks technology will be making.