Books That Caught Our Eye

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Here at Mailbox Monday, we want to encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received. We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Here are the books that caught our eyes this week:

VICKI:

A Good Marriage by Stephen King @Under My Apple Tree and Bermudaonion

Soon to be a major motion picture starring Kristen Connelly, Joan Allen, and Anthony La Paglia, Stephen King’s short story, “A Good Marriage” from Full Dark, No Stars is now available as a stand-alone audio edition!

Bob Anderson, Darcy’s husband of more than twenty years, is away on one of his business trips, when his unsuspecting wife looks for batteries in the garage. Her toe knocks up against a box under a worktable and she discovers she doesn’t know her husband at all, but rather has been living with a stranger. This horrifying discovery, rendered with bristling intensity, could be the end of what Darcy though was a good marriage…

It’s King! Gotta read it!

The Girl On The Train by Paula Hawkins @Bakey’s Book Blog

Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning and every night. Every day she rattles over the same track junctions, flashes past the same stretch of cozy suburban homes. And every day she stops at the same signal and she sees the same couple, breakfasting on their roof deck, living the perfect life that Rachel craves for herself—a lifestyle she recently lost. She looks forward to observing this household every morning, even makes up names and narratives for its residents. Then one day Rachel sees someone new in their garden, and soon after, the woman who lived there disappears.

Unable to keep this information to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and in the process is drawn into the lives of the couple she thought of as Jason and Jess but whose names—she has learned from the news—are really Megan and Scott Hipwell.

But the police accuse Rachel of being unreliable, and it’s true that her memories can’t always be trusted. Plus there are the stories that her ex-husband’s new wife has been spreading about her. By the time Megan’s body is found, Rachel is in over her head, intricately entangled in the details of the investigation, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she put others in danger? Has she done more harm than good?

Doesn’t that sound like a really good mystery? Yeeess!

LESLIE:

The Silent Sister by Diane Chamberlain @Posting For Now and Luxury Reading.

Riley MacPherson has spent her entire life believing that her older sister Lisa committed suicide as a teenager. Now, over twenty years later, her father has passed away and she’s in New Bern, North Carolina cleaning out his house when she finds evidence to the contrary. Lisa is alive. Alive and living under a new identity.

I always like a good mystery and this one sounds inviting.

Business in Blue Jeans by Susan Baroncini-Moe @Library of Clean Reads.

…whether you want to work from home, you’re looking for business ideas, or you want to start a business or grow one, no matter where you are in your process, there’s something here for you.

This definitely caught the eye of the business woman in me. The days of a long, leisure retirement are not going to happen for many of us. The extra income from a freelance or home-based business, preferably something I enjoy, is one solution. Now, how do I do that?

SERENA:

Jane and the Twelve Days of Christmas: Being a Jane Austen Mystery by Stephanie Barron @Luxury Reading

Most people who know me, know I love Jane Austen.  I’ve read so many spin-offs and re-imaginings, but I can’t seem to get enough, even if some are not as well done as others.  This one is about Jane Austen and her Christmastime festivities that are one day interrupted by a mysterious death.  Of course the guests are snowbound with a killer, and Jane is determined to uncover who the murderer is.  I love mysteries that are well done, and if you throw in Jane Austen, I’m bound to love it, if its done well.

 

 

Pen & Ink: Tattoos and the Stories Behind Them by Isaac Fitzgerald, illustrated by Wendy MacNaughton, introduced by Cheryl Strayed. @Under My Apple Tree

I love checking out what other people have selected for tattoos, and they often have great stories behind them.  I know this from experience, but I cannot wait to see what stories these authors have collected and what the corresponding tattoos are.  It’s interesting to see what the motivation behind tattoos is for some people, and there are a wide spectrum of answers you’ll get if you ask.  Plus my husband and I have tattoos of our own — not too many — but enough to have a story or two.

What books caught your eyes this week?

Mailbox Monday

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September is nearly half over already and I’ve got tons of tomatoes pouring in from my garden … STILL.  The squash decided that this was the month to begin flowering, so I hope the weather holds out so we can see some veggies from that plant.  I hope everyone is enjoying their September.

Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

How was everyone’s week? Any goodies in your mailbox? Let us know what you received by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky:

Be sure to stop back on Wednesday when I will be posting Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

4 Comments

Here at Mailbox Monday, we want to encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received. We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

While Bones Never Die by Kathy Reichs did not make my list this week, I was jealous of the packaging @Beauty in Ruins.

Here are the books that caught our eyes this week:

VICKI:

A Brief History of Seven Killings by Marlon James @Bermudaonion

On December 3, 1976, just before the Jamaican general election and two days before Bob Marley was to play the Smile Jamaica Concert, gunmen stormed his house, machine guns blazing. The attack nearly killed the Reggae superstar, his wife, and his manager, and injured several others. Marley would go on to perform at the free concert on December 5, but he left the country the next day, not to return for two years.

Deftly spanning decades and continents and peopled with a wide range of characters—assassins, journalists, drug dealers, and even ghosts—A Brief History of Seven Killings is the fictional exploration of that dangerous and unstable time and its bloody aftermath, from the streets and slums of Kingston in the ‘70s, to the crack wars in ‘80s New York, to a radically altered Jamaica in the ‘90s. Brilliantly inventive and stunningly ambitious, this novel is a revealing modern epic that will secure Marlon James’ place among the great literary talents of his generation.

As a fan of Bob Marley, this book really interests me.

The Mathematician’s Shiva by Stuart Rojstaczer @Bermudaonion

When the greatest female mathematician in history passes away, her son, Alexander “Sasha” Karnokovitch, just wants to mourn his mother in peace. But rumor has it the notoriously eccentric Polish émigré has solved one of the most difficult problems in all of mathematics, and has spitefully taken the solution to her grave. As a ragtag group of mathematicians from around the world descends upon Rachela’s shiva, determined to find the proof or solve it for themselves—even if it means prying up the floorboards for notes or desperately scrutinizing the mutterings of her African Grey parrot—Sasha must come to terms with his mother’s outsized influence on his life.

Spanning decades and continents, from a crowded living room in Madison, Wisconsin, to the windswept beach on the Barents Sea where a young Rachela had her first mathematical breakthrough, The Mathematician’s Shiva is an unexpectedly moving and uproariously funny novel that captures humanity’s drive not just to survive, but to achieve the impossible.

I love math. I love funny. This book has both…and more.

LESLIE:

Lost and Found by Brooke Davis @Sam Still Reading

Millie wants to find her mum. Karl wants to find out how to be a man. And Agatha just wants everything to go back to how it was. They will discover that old age is not the same as death, that the young can be wise, and that letting yourself experience sadness just might be the key to life.

The twitter treasure hunt for the book by the publisher was a very clever idea – and got me to read more about the book, which sounds like a good story. Unfortunately it’s not available in the US at this time, but that didn’t stop me from putting it on my ‘to-read-someday’ list.

Ballroom by Alice Simpson @I’d Rather Be At The Beach.

Told in interconnecting stories, Ballroom is a beautifully crafted debut novel—reminiscent of the works of Elizabeth Strout and Jennifer Haigh—about a group of strangers united by a desire to escape their complicated lives, if only for a few hours each week, in a faded New York City dance hall.

I like short stories that are intertwined into what is almost a novel (as opposed to unrelated short stories with no obvious beginning or ending).

SERENA:

Prisoner of Night and Fog by Anne Blankman @The Reading Date

This one is about Hitler’s niece Gretchen and how she falls for a young Jewish reporter. I like reading about WWII, particularly the nuances of relationships between Germans and Jews during that time, especially given the Reich’s laws.

 

The Bunny Rabbit Show! by Sandra Boynton @Bermudaonion

This is just another in a long series of fun books for kids with sing-song text.  This book stars a cast of high-kicking bunnies performing in perfect unison to a lively song all about . . . them.  My daughter loves Boynton books, and what kid doesn’t, really?  I know that she loves rabbits to, so this one is right up her alley!

 

What books caught your eyes this week?

Mailbox Monday

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It’s hard for me to believe that it’s already September and that the Fall rush to back to school is over for most people, and the holidays are approaching quicker than I want them to.  I hope everyone has had a great summer and read some great books.

Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

How was everyone’s week? Any goodies in your mailbox? Let us know what you received by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky:

Be sure to stop back on Wednesday when I will be posting Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

4 Comments

Here at Mailbox Monday, we want to encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received. We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Here are the books that caught our eyes this week:

Vicki:

Flowers For Algernon by Daniel Keyes @Booklover Book Reviews

A mentally disabled man whose experimental quest for intelligence mirrors that of Algernon, an extraordinary lab mouse. In poignant diary entries, Charlie tells how a brain operation increases his IQ and changes his life. As the experimental procedure takes effect, Charlie’s intelligence expands until it surpasses that of the doctors who engineered his metamorphosis. The experiment seems to be a scientific breakthrough of paramount importance–until Algernon begins his sudden, unexpected deterioration. Will the same happen to Charlie?

When I was in Jr. high we had to read the first version of this book which was tamed down. This version is the extended version, which isn’t suitable for children. I’ve been thinking for about a month now that I want to re-read it, so even though this isn’t the first time seeing this book, it is definitely one that caught my eye.

How We Got to Now by Steven Johnson @Under My Apple Tree

In this illustrated volume, Steven Johnson explores the history of innovation over centuries, tracing facets of modern life (refrigeration, clocks, and eyeglass lenses, to name a few) from their creation by hobbyists, amateurs, and entrepreneurs to their unintended historical consequences.

I love learning new things so this sounds like a perfect book for me. It’s going on my list to read.

Leslie:

Yesterday’s Kin by Nancy Kress at Beauty in Ruins.

Geneticist Marianne Jenner is having a career breakthrough, yet her family is tearing itself apart. Her children Elizabeth and Ryan constantly bicker, agreeing only that an alien conspiracy is in play. Her youngest, Noah, is addicted to a drug that keeps temporarily changing his identity. The Jenner family could not be further apart. But between the four of them, the course of human history will be forever altered.

I love the cover, and if you want me to pick up a book, the DNA helix swirling around the globe will usually do it. Science fiction has always been a favorite genre of mine, and this one sounds good.

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel at Bakey’s Book Blog.

An audacious, darkly glittering novel set in the eerie days of civilization’s collapse, Station Eleven tells the spellbinding story of a Hollywood star, his would-be savior, and a nomadic group of actors roaming the scattered outposts of the Great Lakes region, risking everything for art and humanity.

I was in the mood for some science fiction this week.

Serena:

Wouldn’t It Be Deadly (Eliza Doolittle & Henry Higgins Mystery #1) by D.E. Ireland @Luxury Reading

I’ve loved the musical My Fair Lady for ages, and I get a giggle out of it every time I watch it. I love the character of Eliza Doolittle, and I think this is a fantastic idea for a mystery series. After Henry Higgins turns her into a duchess, at least for a day, Eliza finds herself employed by his rival, who happens to end up dead after claiming to have transformed Eliza himself. Sounds like my kind of cozy mystery, and it is bound to have some punchy dialogue!

 

The Secret Diary of Lizzie Bennet by Kate Rorick and Bernie Su @Sam Still Reading

This one sounds like an ultra-modern and fun story based on Pride & Prejudice by Jane Austen, which as many people know I read at least once every couple of year because I love it so much.  In this one, Lizzie Bennet is recording her reflections on life for a thesis project, but these YouTube videos suddenly make her and her sisters famous.  Eek.  Beyond the videos there is a secret diary that contains the insider information we all want to know about the Bennets and William Darcy, etc.  Yes, this one seems like it will be juicy and fun!

What books caught your eyes this week?

Mailbox Monday

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Happy Labor Day to everyone in the United States!  We have a 3-day weekend in my house, though I’ve had 5 days off in a fortuitous turn of fate.

Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

How was everyone’s week? Any goodies in your mailbox? Let us know what you received by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky:

Be sure to stop back on Wednesday when I will be posting Books That Caught Our Eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

7 Comments

Books That Caught Our Eye

Here at Mailbox Monday, we want to encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received. We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Here are the books that caught our eye this week:

Serena

ThreeStoryHouseThree Story House by Courtney Miller Santo @ Silver’s Reviews and @ Book Dilettante.

I love stories about home renovation, which is probably why I love the series by Wendy Wax so much about strong women who renovate homes. But I digress. This novel by Courtney Miller Santo is about the renovation of a Memphis house, but more than that its about a family and its failures to live up to expectations and their own aspirations and coming to terms with those failures. In many ways, I would expect the renovation of the house to mirror the changes with each of the cousins.

RuthsJourneyRuth’s Journey by Donald McCaig @ Luxury Reading.

Gone With the Wind — need I say more? Ok, this novel recounts the life of Ruth, or Mammy as she is known in Margaret Mitchell’s book. From her days as an abandoned child in Saint Domingue to her life in Savannah as grows up, takes her first job and comes to the home of the O’Hara’s.

Vicki

RuthsJourneyRuth’s Journey by Donald McCaig @ Luxury Reading.

Authorized by the Margaret Mitchell Estate, here is the first-ever prequel to one of the most beloved and bestselling novels of all time, Gone with the Wind. The critically acclaimed author of Rhett Butler’s People magnificently recounts the life of Mammy, one of literature’s greatest supporting characters, from her days as a slave girl to the outbreak of the Civil War.

I haven’t read Gone With The Wind, but have seen the movie and loved it, so this book really interests me. I will read GWTW before reading this though. I also saw that there is another spinoff called Rhett Butler’s People that I’d like to read also.

CancelTheWeddingCancel the Wedding by Carolyn T. Dingman @ Bermudaonion

A heartfelt fiction debut that will appeal to fans of Emily Giffin’s Southern charm and Jennifer Weiner’s compelling, emotionally resonant novels about the frustrations of blood ties, Cancel the Wedding follows one woman’s journey to discover the secrets of her mother’s hidden past—and confront her own uncertain future.

I love books about sisters and mother/daughter relationships and this sounds really good. I want to find out what their mother has been hiding.

Leslie

GirlFromTheWellThe Girl from the Well by Rin Chupeco at Book Dilettante.

A dead girl walks the streets. She hunts murderers. Child killers, much like the man who threw her body down a well three hundred years ago.

Oooh, this is perfect timing. I was looking for some new creepy books to add to my reading list for September and October for the RIP Challenge, and this certainly fits my definition of horror-worthy.

The Sound of Waves by Yukio Mishima at Sam Still Reading

SoundOfWavesSet in a remote fishing village in Japan, The Sound of Waves is a timeless story of first love. It tells of Shinji, a young fisherman and Hatsue, the beautiful daughter of the wealthiest man in the village.

While I don’t judge a book by its cover, often the cover is what makes me read a little more. This one definitely falls into that category. This is a short novel, a classic translated from Japanese. I would like to read more Asian literature and this seems a good one to try.