Books That Caught Our Eye

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Here at Mailbox Monday, we want to encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

To that end, we’ve decided to share “Books that Caught Our Eye” with you. Each week, LeslieSerena and Vicki  will each share 2 books that caught their eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday and share them here.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

 

Serena
20708757I’m My Own Dog by David Ezra Stein @ Bermudaonion
We’re dog people in our house, and this book looks like it will be a fun read with my daughter.

Many dogs have human owners. Not this dog. He fetches his own slippers, curls up at his own feet, and gives himself a good scratch. But there is one spot, in the middle of his back, that he just can’t reach. So one day, he lets a human scratch it. And the poor little fella follows him home. What can the dog do but get a leash to lead the guy around with? Dog lovers of all ages will revel in the humorous role-reversal as this dog teaches his human all the skills he needs to be a faithful companion.

 

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The Paris Winter by Imogen Robertson @ Silver’s Reviews
I love books about artists and artistic types, especially in wonderful cities filled with art, like Paris. And I like darker books with secrets to be uncovered. Couldn’t resist this one this week.

A deep, dark and opulent tale of Belle epoque Paris, and the secrets and dangers hidden beneath its luxurious facade. Maud Heighton came to Lafond’s famous Academie to paint, and to flee the constraints of her small English town. It took all her courage to escape, but Paris eats money. While her fellow students enjoy the dazzling joys of the Belle epoque, Maud slips into poverty. Quietly starving, and dreading another cold Paris winter, Maud takes a job as companion to young, beautiful Sylvie Morel. But Sylvie has a secret: an addiction to opium. As Maud is drawn into the Morels’ world of elegant luxury, their secrets become hers. Before the New Year arrives, a greater deception will plunge her into the darkness that waits beneath this glittering city of light.

 

Leslie
So Anyway… by John Cleese at Sam Still Reading 23347251
Candid and brilliantly funny, this is the story of how a tall, shy youth from Weston-super-Mare went on to become a self-confessed legend.

Apparently John Cleese wrote a memoir and I didn’t know about it! Oh, I could quote Fawlty Towers all night!
 

 

 

 

Fire Birds:Valuing Natural Wildfires and Burned Forests by Sneed B. Collard III at The Busy Mom’s Dailydownload
Collard reveals the complex relationships between fire and thriving plant and animal communities. The book especially focuses on the heavy use of burned forests by dozens of bird species and debunks the idea that burned forests are worthless wastelands.

As a volunteer for the forest preserve and bird monitor, this is a fascinating subject that I’m always interested in reading about. And it’s nice to see a book targeted at young readers – although I’m sure us older folks can learn something from it too.

 

Vicki
20309175My True Love Gave To Me: Twelve Holiday Stories by Stephanie Perkins, Rainbow Rowell, & 10 more @ The Reading Date
If you love holiday stories, holiday movies, made-for-TV-holiday specials, holiday episodes of your favorite sitcoms and, especially, if you love holiday anthologies, you’re going to fall in love with My True Love Gave to Me: Twelve Holiday Stories by twelve bestselling young adult writers (Holly Black, Ally Carter, Matt de La Peña, Gayle Forman, Jenny Han, David Levithan, Kelly Link, Myra McEntire, Rainbow Rowell, Stephanie Perkins, Laini Tayler and Kiersten White), edited by the international bestselling Stephanie Perkins. Whether you celebrate Christmas or Hanukkah, Winter Solstice or Kwanzaa, there’s something here for everyone. So curl up by the fireplace and get cozy. You have twelve reasons this season to stay indoors and fall in love.

I’ve never read a lot of Christmas centered books, but I’ve been seeing them on different blogs lately and thought I should try another one. This is a short story book, by various authors and it jumped out at me.

 

Florence Gordon by Brian Morton @ Posting For Now20256545
A wise and entertaining novel about a woman who has lived life on her own terms for seventy-five defiant and determined years, only to find herself suddenly thrust to the center of her family’s various catastrophes

Meet Florence Gordon: blunt, brilliant, cantankerous and passionate, feminist icon to young women, invisible and underappreciated by most everyone else. At seventy-five, Florence has earned her right to set down the burdens of family and work and shape her legacy at long last. But just as she is beginning to write her long-deferred memoir, her son Daniel returns to New York from Seattle with his wife and daughter, and they embroil Florence in their dramas, clouding the clarity of her days with the frustrations of middle-age and the confusions of youth. And then there is her left foot, which is starting to drag.

With searing wit, sophisticated intelligence, and a tender respect for humanity in all its flaws, Brian Morton introduces a constellation of unforgettable characters. Chief among them, Florence, who can humble the fools surrounding her with one barbed line, but who eventually finds there are realities even she cannot outsmart.

I love family drama and this sounds really good. Florence sounds like a great character!

Mailbox Monday

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mmb-300x282

Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week.

Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

Every Wednesday for Books That Caught Our Eye, Leslie, Serena and I will each share 2 books that grabbed our attention from today’s Mailbox Monday post. We hope you’ll join us by posting a comment letting us know the books that caught your eye.

~~~What’s the weather like where you live? I’m wondering if this year will be as crazy as it was last year. It’s supposed to be in the 80’s here this week which is good, I just hope the humidity won’t be high so I can stand being outside for more than 10 minutes.

I hope everyone has a great week!~~~

Books That Caught Our Eye

4 Comments

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Here at Mailbox Monday, we want to encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

To that end, we’ve decided to share “Books that Caught Our Eye” with you. Each week, LeslieSerena and Vicki  will each share 2 books that caught their eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday and share them here.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Leslie
21535268The Penguin Book of Witches by Katherine Howe at Melissa’s Eclectic Bookshelf.
Chilling real-life accounts of witches, from medieval Europe through colonial America. The Penguin Book of Witches is a treasury of historical accounts of accused witches that sheds light on the reality behind the legends.

I always find this stuff fascinating. And now that Halloween is approaching, it becomes even more topical.

 

 

 

The Devil’s Detective by Simon Kurt Unsworth at Beauty in Ruins22543948
Thomas Fool is an Information Man, an investigator tasked with cataloging and filing reports on the endless stream of violence and brutality that flows through Hell. His job holds no reward or satisfaction, because Hell has rules but no justice. Each new crime is stamped “Do Not Investigate” and dutifully filed away in the depths of the Bureaucracy. But when an important political delegation arrives and a human is found murdered in a horrific manner—extravagant even by Hell’s standards—everything changes.

I am reading creepy stories this month for RIP IX – the creepier the better – and this sounds like a perfect fit!

 

 

 

Serena
18510237Hug Machine by Scott Campbell @ Under My Apple Tree

My daughter loves hugging right now, and there are some people that don’t hug as adults. I wonder if more of these books would help make people more willing to hug and show affection as they get older.

We’re always looking for cute books to read together and this sounds like one that would encourage her to continue hugging.

 

 

Of all the Gin Joints: Stumbling through Hollywood History by Mark Bailey, illustrated by Edward Hemingway @Rose City Reader21853232
This intrigues me because I really like books about the history of Hollywood, and this one is illustrated. I love stories about hijinks, and this one sounds like it fits the bill. And it includes cocktail recipes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vicki
17349207The Absence of Mercy by John Burley @ Fiction Books 
A doctor and father in small town Ohio weighs the need to catch a killer against his fears for his family’s safety in this debut psychological suspense novel

Just west of the Ohio River, lies the peaceful town of Wintersville. Safe from the crime and congestion of city life, it is the perfect place to raise a family . . . or so they thought.

Life as the town medical examiner is relatively unhurried for Dr. Ben Stevenson. With only a smattering of cases here and there-car accident victims, death by natural causes-he has plenty of time to spend with his loving wife and two sons. That is until a teenager’s body is discovered in the woods and Ben, as the only coroner in the area, is assigned to the case. But as the increasingly animalistic attacks continue, the case challenges Ben in ways he never suspects.

With its eerie portrait of suburban life and nerve-fraying plot twists, this is psychological suspense at its best-an extraordinary debut that challenges as much as it thrills.

My favorite genre is thriller/mystery and I haven’t been reading much of it lately. So when I read the blurb I knew it was a book I wanted to read . Even though I know this is a fiction, it didn’t hurt that I grew up 2 hrs. from Wintersville, where the story takes place.

 

Big Driver by Stephen King @ Under My Apple Tree22929097
Now a Lifetime original movie, Stephen King’s haunting story about an author of a series of mystery novels who tries to reconcile her old life with her life after a horrific attack and the one thing that can save her: Revenge.

Tess Thorne, a famous mystery writer, faces a long drive home following a book signing engagement. Advised to take a shortcut at the suggestion of the event’s planner, Tess sets out for home, well after dark. On a lonely stretch of New England road, her tire blows out, and when a man in a pick up stops, it is not to help her, but to repeatedly assault her and leave her for dead. Tess survives, and she plots a revenge that will bring her face-to-face with another stranger: the one inside herself, capable of gruesome violence.

It’s King and I haven’t read it yet. :)
(FYI~ the movie based on this book is on Lifetime this Saturday and Sunday. I’m going to dvr it but I’ll probably do what I always do, and wait to watch it until after I read the book.

Mailbox Monday

6 Comments

mmb-300x282Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week.

Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy,
toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

On Wednesday I’ll be posting Books That Caught Our Eye. Serena, Leslie and I will each share 2 books that grabbed our attention from today’s Mailbox Monday post. We hope you’ll join us by posting a comment letting us know the books that caught your eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

8 Comments

unnamed

Here at Mailbox Monday, we want to encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received.

To that end, we’ve decided to share “Books that Caught Our Eye” with you. Each week, LeslieSerena and Vicki  will each share 2 books that caught their eye from that week’s Mailbox Monday and share them here.

We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Sorry this is late today…I had some internet issues*^$&(%!!

Here are the books that caught our eye this week:

Leslie
21840310The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins at BermudaOnion.
A debut psychological thriller. Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. “Jess and Jason,” she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost. And then she sees something shocking.

I took the the train to the city for work for 20 years and it’s true, people and places, even those you don’t know, become familiar. I don’t know that I’ve ever seen anything shocking… but then, I don’t what the girl on the train saw! This does sound good.

The Bookseller by Cynthia Swanson at Serendipity22635858
The Bookseller follows a woman in the 1960s who must reconcile her reality with the tantalizing alternate world of her dreams. Nothing is as permanent as it appears.

Ever since I began watching Mad Men I’ve been fascinated with the 60s. I lived through them, but was too young to enjoy them! So I read about it instead.

 

 

 

Serena
18050185Cathedral of the Wild by Boyd Varty from I’d Rather Be at the Beach

I love Nelson Mandela and I think it would be fascinating to find out about the place he went to recover after his imprisonment.

When Nelson Mandela was released after twenty-seven years of imprisonment, he needed a place to recover and adjust to his new life. He went to Londolozi Game Reserve. Founded over eighty years ago by Boyd Varty’s great-grandfather, Londolozi started as a hunting safari. But in 1973, Boyd’s visionary father, Dave, transformed it into a nature reserve, creating a blueprint for modern-day conservation. This transformation is the backdrop of Boyd’s family history and his own personal odyssey.

The Tudor Vendetta by C.W. Gortner from So Many Books, So Little Time 20575433

I’m not really that big into reading about the Tudors, but I love C.W. Gortner.

Upon the death of Mary I (Bloody Mary), Elizabeth I takes the throne and Brendan Prescott is called to aid the young queen amid a realm plunged into chaos and a court rife with conspiracy.

 

 

 

 

Vicki
18656792Dear Bully of Mine by Vicki Fraser found @ Library Of Clean Reads 
Self-worth, confidence and self-esteem are three qualities that can give children the strength to stand up for themselves and others. Join these three characters as they share their honest feelings with their dear bullies. Watch their internal battle as they begin to question the power that their bullies have over them. Witness their quiet evolution as they take back what is rightfully theirs; freedom to live in peace.

I’m not going to let this continue.
What you are doing is wrong.
I have every right to be happy.

I am
Worthy,
Deserving,
Strong.

Everyone can benefit from daily affirmation that they have value. This book does just that.

I can’t remember anyone ever being bullied when I went to school, but nowadays you hear about it all the time. I hate that kids get bullied. Makes me really sad. This is a short book at only 32 pages, but I think every school should have it for elementary school required reading.

 

Ghost Story by Peter Straub by Peter Straub seen @ It’s A Kind Of Magic…Book

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For four aging men in the terror-stricken town of Milburn, New York, an act inadvertently carried out in their youth has come back to haunt them. Now they are about to learn what happens to those who believe they can bury the past — and get away with murder.

Stephen King says “The terror just mounts and mounts.” That’s good enough for me!!

Mailbox Monday

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mmb-300x282Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week.

Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy,
toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

On Wednesday I’ll be posting Books That Caught Our Eye. Serena, Leslie and I will each share 2 books that grabbed our attention from today’s Mailbox Monday post. We hope you’ll join us by posting a comment letting us know the books that caught your eye.

Books That Caught Our Eye

4 Comments

Here at Mailbox Monday, we want to encourage participants to not only share the books they received, but to check out the books others have received. We encourage you to share the books that caught your eye in the comments.

Here are the books that caught our eyes this week:

VICKI:

What You Left Behind by Samantha Hayes @Musings from Sri Lanka

Five years ago, nineteen-year-old Simon Hawkeswell hanged himself in his family home in Warwickshire, England. The reasons behind his choice remain in devastating mystery, and what’s worse, not long after his death a wave of “sympathetic” suicides among local teens rocked the community. But that was then. A short-lived, sinister trend that’s faded into oblivion. Or so everyone thought. When a young man is kidded in a freak motorbike accident and the authorities find a suicide note on him, the nightmare of repeat suicides once again threatens their village.

I love this kind of mystery/thriller.

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson @The Reading Date

Jude and her twin brother, Noah, are incredibly close. At thirteen, isolated Noah draws constantly and is falling in love with the charismatic boy next door, while daredevil Jude cliff-dives and wears red-red lipstick and does the talking for both of them. But three years later, Jude and Noah are barely speaking. Something has happened to wreck the twins in different and dramatic ways . . . until Jude meets a cocky, broken, beautiful boy, as well as someone else—an even more unpredictable new force in her life. The early years are Noah’s story to tell. The later years are Jude’s. What the twins don’t realize is that they each have only half the story, and if they could just find their way back to one another, they’d have a chance to remake their world.

This book grabbed my attention because I have a twin brother and growing up we were very close. Then we each left home and that changed our relationship. He went into the Marines right out of high school and made a career out of it so he was always in another state or country. We didn’t get to see each other very often, and see each other less now. I miss being able to see him and spend time with him like we used to. I want to see if Jude and Noah find their way back to each other.

LESLIE:

Hello From the Gillespies by Monica McInerney @The Reading Date and Serendipity.

For the past thirty-three years, Angela Gillespie has sent to friends and family around the world an end-of-the-year letter titled “Hello from the Gillespies.” It’s always been cheery and full of good news. This year, Angela surprises herself—she tells the truth….

As the weather turns cold and Christmas approaches, I try to get into the spirit and read a holiday book – but I usually choose something a little different than a traditional story. This sounds like a fun spin on those newsletters everyone loves to hate.

The Marshmallow Test by Walter Mischel @BermudaOnion

Renowned psychologist Walter Mischel, designer of the famous Marshmallow Test, explains what self-control is and how to master it. A child is presented with a marshmallow and given a choice: Eat this one now, or wait and enjoy two later. What will she do? And what are the implications for her behavior later in life?

Sounds like a fascinating look at behavior – and whether or not it can be molded or changed. This would be a good one for my book club. (I’d wait and take two marshmallows!)

SERENA:

Shadows in the Vineyard by Maximillian Potter @Bermudaonion

I just love stories about vineyards and I love a good mystery. This combines both for me:

In January 2010, Aubert de Villaine, the famed proprietor of the Domaine de la Romanée-Conti, the tiny, storied vineyard that produces the most expensive, exquisite wines in the world, received an anonymous note threatening the destruction of his priceless vines by poison-a crime that in the world of high-end wine is akin to murder-unless he paid a one million euro ransom. Villaine believed it to be a sick joke, but that proved a fatal miscalculation and the crime shocked this fabled region of France. The sinister story that Vanity Fair journalist Maximillian Potter uncovered would lead to a sting operation by some of France’s top detectives, the primary suspect’s suicide, and a dramatic investigation. This botanical crime threatened to destroy the fiercely traditional culture surrounding the world’s greatest wine.

Moriarty by Anthony Horowitz @I’d Rather Be at the Beach and Book Dilettante

It’s Sherlock Holmes and sanctioned by Doyle’s estate, what more convincing do you need?

The game is once again afoot in this thrilling mystery from the bestselling author of The House of Silk, sanctioned by the Conan Doyle estate, which explores what really happened when Sherlock Holmes and his arch nemesis Professor Moriarty tumbled to their doom at the Reichenbach Falls.

What books caught your eye this week?